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"Breaking Bad" — "Rabid Dog": The Awakening of Jesse Pinkman

By Daniel Carlson | TV Reviews | September 1, 2013 | Comments ()


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A lot of TV critics would probably be reluctant to tell you that sometimes, there’s not much to say, or not as much, anyway. It’s not that the episode wasn’t great. (“Rabid Dog,” this week’s episode of “Breaking Bad,” was wonderful.) It’s not that the show isn’t good, either. (“Breaking Bad,” at this point, has earned itself a place in the firmament of those TV series that showcase the medium’s greatest potential.) Rather, it’s that some episodes just have a lot less to unpack. We usually call these “table-setters,” and we push for ways to talk about them that feel revelatory or new, but the reality is that sometimes, you just sit back and watch a great hour of TV. For reviews, mostly what I do is I think about the show off and on throughout the week, then I watch the new episode, then I look for connections between what happened in the episode, what’s been happening in the series overall, and what kind of themes or cultural ties are presenting themselves. That’s a lot of it, right there. And, well, this week’s episode was just the kind of standard greatness I’ve come to expect from “Breaking Bad” after close to 60 episodes. It’s good in all the ways you want it to be. Everything’s still dark (emotionally as well as technically), everybody’s still wearing the colors that currently reflect their moods and masks, everything’s still hurtling toward a showdown that’s bound to have a body count. You don’t need me to tell you that again, at least not this time.

It’s quietly comforting to know when tuning into a show that it will be tightly written, powerfully acted, skillfully directed. The work that goes into making this show good hasn’t faltered over the years. Episode writer Sam Catlin has been with the show for several seasons, but this was his first time as a director, and he choreographed some expert moments. The slow pull back down the hallway as Walt goes into his bedroom, not knowing what he might find, and leaving us to writhe outside wondering if this is when he’ll finally confront Jesse — that was glorious. Catlin also played tight and smart by letting Walt’s confused search for Jesse play out for a while before jumping back in time to show Hank surprising Jesse at the White house and whisking him away seconds before Walt got back. Jesse’s absence hung like a cloud over the first half of the episode, and hooks like that — What happened to Jesse? Who’s on the other end of the phone? — are part of what’s made the show so riveting within each episode even while it’s playing out a larger story. Seasonal arcs have worked the same way, from the plane wreckage that dotted the cold opens of the second season to the jumps we’ve seen in this final season showing Walt arming himself for some final confrontation. The show’s nothing if not captivating that way.

What the episode seemed to hinge on more than anything was the idea that nobody gets away clean. Walt had destroyed so many lives around him, and now those actions are being repaid. He’s made a mortal enemy out of a kid he pulled into his life, and he’s turned his wife into someone as ruthless as he is. (Because let’s not kid ourselves: Skyler’s suggestion to kill Jesse is not one iota more horrifying than Walt’s decision to poison a child as part of a frame-up.) Even Hank’s been pushed to the edge here, casually suggesting to Gomez that even if their attempt to lure Walt into self-incrimination ends in Jesse’s death, at least they’d get the murder on tape and have a piece of evidence to bring against the mythical Heisenberg. Even Walt’s attempts to rebuff the idea of killing Jesse felt flat. As a character, he’s always liked to rationalize his cold-bloodedness as an option of last resort, so while he might actually want to kill Jesse, it’s more in line with his m.o. to let other people talk him into it. He’d be just as guilty, but he’d be able to tell himself he had no choice.

That’s really where Walt is, and where he’s always been: making decisions for himself, then acting like he was coerced. But his millions can’t get the smell of gas out of his carpet, and his lies can’t convince his wife, and his pleas won’t work on the people he’s abused. Now it’s just a matter of seeing how things play out. There’s a sense of inevitability as the show marches toward its conclusion, but inevitability doesn’t mean predictability. The people here are doomed, and have been for ages. How they get there, though — that’s what I can’t wait to find out.

Daniel Carlson is the managing editor of Pajiba and a member of the Houston Film Critics Society and the Online Film Critics Society. You can also find him on Twitter.



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Comments Are Welcome, Jerks Will Be Banned


  • Clitty Magoo

    Everything one would need to know about Marie Schrader is summed up by two lines of dialogue.

    1) "How are things at work? Last week you were upset about the new parking rules." --Marie's shrink
    2) "It just feels so good to think about it." --Marie relishing the thought of murdering Walt.

    Jesus Christ, Marie is narcissistic and awful. She needs a trip to Belize.

  • Obst N. Gemuse

    Interesting episode. I, too, noticed the "Dutch" book on the shelf (among other interesting/telling titles!) Did anyone else notice that within the first 5 or so minutes the phrase "That's as good as it gets" was uttered? I think the first time was the carpet guy, and the second time was Walt. That tends to make me believe life gets much worse for all the main characters, going forward.

    Nice symbolism in having Jesse wake up in a slowly-paced scene at Hank's house. Jesse has "woken up".

  • St

    Yeah and remember how Anna Gunn was shaming viewers for hating Skyler just few days ago? Like they were so bad because poor Skyler is just victim, ya’ll. And she fights Walter or something. And then there she is - in cold blood convinces Walter to kill Jesse. Our fun favorite Jesse, who along with Hank are the only two good guys up there.

    Seriously Anna - what is wrong with you? She knew this episode will come, that Skyler will suggest to kill Jesse and still she went with her: "Shame on everyone who hates poor strong Skyler". Skyler is no longer victim or bystander. She is full on partner in crime. And she volunteered.

  • chanohack

    That wasn't the point of her piece at all. It wasn't "Shame on all of you for hating poor Skyler," it was "HMM, WEIRD that people are holding Skyler to an entirely different set of values and standards than Walt" and to express her shock that the intense hatred became personal, directed towards HER, instead of staying directed at the character. Both are excellent points that needed to be made.

  • RoscoeJ

    I think the biggest mistake the show has made is transitioning Skyler into this Lady MacMeth character and positioning Jesse as the conscience of the show. Jesse is played by a charming actor but the character himself isn't innocent enough to do what they are trying to do with him, and Skyler isn't very believable becoming this bad.

  • At the risk of being pelted with rancid internet tomatoes:

    I stopped watching Breaking Bad mid-season 2, but watched this episode with a group of fans. From an outsider's perspective: good to great acting, average writing at best. The hotel room scene was excellent, and the actors are all amazing, but there were some terrible writing moments (that scene by the pool? I was told that's how Walt & Jr bond, but it really just looked like a bad set up to kill the kid later in the episode).

    Granted, I do not watch the show and have no investment in the characters. I stopped watching way back when because the supporting characters were annoying and I had a lack of empathy for the main characters, despite the amazing acting. They are GREAT - would never ever say a bad word about the performances. I totally get why people worship the actors.

    I am planning on going back to watch the entire series and give it a second chance, because I do love great tv drama and anti-heroes (rabid Mad Men fan, worship at the later of Swearengen, etc), and I get yelled at every time I say I don't watch it.

  • GDI

    The supporting cast members don't stop being annoying, you just learn to tolerate them.

    However, I must note that I actually liked Marie's and Skylar's delivery in this episode out of the entire series.

  • RoscoeJ

    Lady MacMeth should be Skyler's new nom-de-internet-snark, rather than Skyesenberg.

    Overall not a great episode. Some key things happened too easily and were brushed over too quickly. It is huge that Hank went to Gomez but we have no idea what Gomez's initial reaction was. And would Jesse really confess on film like that? With no written agreement, no immunity or reduced sentence deal? I don't see him as that stupid regardless of how upset he is.

  • chanohack

    I don't know, the reveal that Hank stopped Jesse from torching the house was pretty awesome.

  • GDI

    It seems more like coercion, given that his other choice is MDC, which Jesse believes will lead to his inevitable death. Maybe immunity is implied? Idk, sounds kinda flimsy.

    When I realized this was a transition episode, I dropped my expectations a bit. Wasn't disappointed.
    If I may, I believe this episode took the scenic route. It was about surveying the King Midas-like touch of Walt and the damage that has wrought.

  • RoscoeJ

    Some good points. Though I don't know what MDC stands for and google didn't help.

  • Clitty Magoo

    Albequerque's local jail where perps are booked is called the Metropolitan Detention Center, or MDC for short. http://www.bernco.gov/metropol...

    Hank referenced once or twice as leverage to make Jesse do what he wants him to do.

  • Mrs. Julien

    Did anyone else see Michael Corleone at the end of Godfather II in the way Walt was sitting in his chair by the water? Anyone?

  • Jabberwookiee

    I sure did. Only because I was watching GF2 on tv before I caught this episode.

  • stella

    Please dont let jesse die. Please dont let jesse die. Please Me Gilligan?

  • kushiro -

    In "Please Me Gilligan", Skipper Jonas Grumby gives us a thorough, warts-and-all look into life on an uncharted island, including an eye-opening account of what really went on in the hut he shared with his "first mate".

    You'll never look at hammocks -- or coconut radios -- the same way again.

  • stella

    Godamn it. Four you, four for you.

  • Wigamer

    I'm curious...we didn't see any of Jesse's confession. I wonder if he took responsibility for Gale's murder, or said it was Walt? And Hank mentioned the Drew Sharp murder, too. Did Jesse pin that on Walt or Todd? It would be interesting if Jesse's tape was a reflection of Walt's, in which Jesse doesn't implicate himself and lays it all off on Walt.

  • Ryan Pingree

    Hank called him a junkie murderer. I think he owned up to it.

  • Collback

    I feel like we'll come back at that confession later on.

  • Ivy

    I felt like the "where you really live" implies that Jesse is going to take over the all important Heisenberg EMPIRE. That's the thing that will hurt Walt the most. Not losing the money. Losing the empire. And as Jesse had just said; he's the only one who is as good as Walt.

  • Long_Pig_Tailor

    Walt doesn't care about that, though. If he did, when Lydia came to him talking about how the quality was going in the toilet, he'd have been right back there to make things better. He gave over his operation to someone else and with it, effectively the Heisenberg mantle.

    Besides which, Jesse was talking to Hank about a better way to take him down. Hank would never be on board with some scenario involving making more meth. For that matter, it's obvious that neither would Jesse.

  • emmalita

    The last paragraph of your review is perfect. If you could only write one paragraph about the episode within the season, this would be the paragraph.

  • Wigamer

    "As a character, he’s always liked to rationalize his cold-bloodedness as an option of last resort, so while he might actually want to kill Jesse, it’s more in line with his m.o. to let other people talk him into it. He’d be just as guilty, but he’d be able to tell himself he had no choice."

    This. Walt has always, always rationalized his behavior. And for whatever reason, there's a whole bunch of viewers willing to accept those rationalizations as truth. Walt has had the choice to end it all along by simply turning himself in. So the choice to kill Jesse instead of taking his very overdue punishment reveals exactly who Walt is, and has been all along.

  • Maddy

    EXACTLY!

  • googergieger

    Ugh. What truth? Give an example, and let us break this down. I mean what turn himself in? Okay, no money, Skyler would have to do some time, Walt Jr finds out, daughter at the very least loses one parent almost immediately. Everything that has been done, has been done literally for nothing now. Rationalization? That is the fucking facts, love. Cold blooded logic, is the best way to describe Walt. Most of the time at least.

  • Long_Pig_Tailor

    I think I almost entirely agree here. Walt is mostly a kind of rigorously logical guy, simply to the point of amorality. There is, of course, also a definite element of ego and narcissism that drives him, which is the part that gets him into trouble. Most of his actions are the ones that, should everything go perfectly according to the plan, will secure his and his family's safety and financial well-being, even if dozens of people need to die in order for that to happen. He's not rationalizing much of anything for himself, I suspect, as he is for others when confronted with the fact they think him a monster. What's interesting is that he'll do that even when there's no damn point, as after he shot Mike.

  • googergieger

    He straight up thugs out in Saul's presence now. He dominated Skyler for a minute. When he knew Hank knew, he straight up told him to back off. The dvd he made? His rationalization alright. He had to kill Mike as well. Jesse said it. He couldn't let Mike live if he was going to kill his guys.

  • chanohack

    That's not quite what Jesse said. He said that Walt couldn't kill Mike's guys without catching consequences from Mike unless Mike was dead. Jesse wasn't tipped off that Mike was dead because of Walt's killing spree. He realized it because Mike didn't come back afterward.

    And Walt didn't kill Mike so he could kill the guys. His "justification" (which he later unraveled himself) for hurting Mike was because he needed the list of witnesses. And even then he may not have done it, as seen when he walks to the car before doubling back, if Mike hadn't insulted him. Walt killed Mike because Mike didn't give him what he wanted-- the list, and/or respect.

  • googergieger

    Same difference to what I said, but alright.

    Why did he need the list? I don't know see, we've gotten to know Walt and his logic. Don't know why we would need him to point blank tell us his reasons for doing things. Walt and Mike were a long time coming due to respect. Even then Mike did respect Walt, it was more Walt considered him beneath him and Mike didn't believe or accept that. Suffice to say needed the list to off the guys, and Mike could no live with no consequences to show for it, if he did off the guys. Think Walt if anyone would know this.

  • chanohack

    What I'm saying is Walt didn't meet Mike with the explicit intention of killing him (he took the gun in case he needed it, but he almost walked away), so saying Walt "couldn't let Mike live" is not true. He didn't let Mike live because Mike told him off and he forgot that he could get the list from Lydia. Walt said himself that he didn't have to kill Mike and apologized. Why would he say it, at that moment, if he didn't mean it? Why would he lie to dying Mike? He absolutely did not have to kill Mike to kill the guys, and both he and Mike knew it. It was a crime of passion, not logic.

  • googergieger

    You know what, after a night or so of having slept on it after getting hit by a garbage truck yesterday, have to say...you're probably right. Walt is known to have lapses in his cold logic. Most of the time having to do with Jesse, but yeah. Fair point.

  • Wigamer

    I feel like it's very much after the fact rationalization. In the moment he acts on impulse.

  • Wigamer

    In my opinion, Walt would actually be a stronger character if he didn't rationalize. Walt has moments of embracing Heisenberg fully, but can't quite go there because he wants it both ways. He wants to tell himself he's doing all of this out of necessity, that Jesse is off limits...but clearly Jesse's NOT, because he just ordered a HIT on him. Which means Jesse was never off limits, Walt has just reached a point where he can't manipulate him anymore.

    If Walt was a true, cold-blooded killer that does shit purely out of necessity, he would have pulled a Gus Fring and killed Jesse himself, a long time ago. But he can't, because he still has to think of himself as fundamentally a good person.

  • googergieger

    Jesse was off limits. Just like Hank was. But guess what, Walt was directly threatened by both, so options change. He does do everything out of neccessity. We might not agree with him, but we need to understand the fact that this is his mind, his thoughts, his morals, etc. Park Chan Wook said it best when asked why Oh Dae Su in Oldboy...

    OLDBOY SPOILERS

    didn't ask the hypnotist to erase his and Midoh's memory of the relationship all together. And Park answered by saying because the relationship to her as a lover was more important than that of a father to him. And that he didn't agree with it and most people won't, but that you should at least understand it.

    END OF SPOILERS

    No, good and no evil. Very black and white way of looking at things. He doesn't care about that. He is above that. It is about right and wrong. HIS right and HIS wrong.

  • DarthCorleone

    Yeah, I don't agree. Walt has bent over backward for Jesse, and I don't think it's just to preserve his own idea of being a good person. Hank's analysis was spot on. If Walt had left the drug dealers off the hood of the Aztec, he'd be peacefully making millions with Fring right now.

    I would say rather than claiming that Jesse was *never* off-limits, this decisiion simply means that he has reached a point where he must choose between his wife and the surrogate son that just threatened the life of him and his family, and he can only choose one.

    If Walt didn't genuinely care about Jesse, he would have to be a complete moron to risk going out into that plaza to try to mend fences the way that he did, and we know he's not a moron.

  • Long_Pig_Tailor

    This. Walt's not remotely a nice or good person, but he does care for Jesse at least as much as he cares for his actual family. Aside from how often he could've let Jesse hang and didn't, he habitually lies to and manipulates Jesse when he doesn't necessarily have to, when it's more about making him feel better about something than actually about keeping Jesse going. It's him trying to salvage the relationship for its own sake than just trying to achieve a given goal. If he didn't care, he could've done less and not been much worse off.

  • Wigamer

    No, Walt is not remotely nice or good. But I don't think Walt knows that. He is blind to the truth about himself, which is that he is fundamentally weak. It's the weakness in him that has him rationalizing his behavior. Never forget what his life was like when we met him--powerless over the circumstances of his life, clueless as to how to change. Heisenberg is a mask he wears, but the weak, insecure Walt is always behind it.

  • ed newman

    I tried 3 different times to write that I hope that Walt's use of Todd's uncle is for a plan other than a hit (and I still do), but when I think it through I realize Walt would use someone else if there was any other plan.

  • Wigamer

    Yeah, he doesn't have any other reason to call in Todd & the Skinheads, does he?

  • emmalita

    Jesse is looking all bright-eyed and bushy tailed. This is the Jesse that came up with the magnet idea and the train heist. Now the real dance begins.

    Nobody is buying Walt's shit anymore. Not even Walt Jr., though he lacks the information to leap to the right conclusions. He is leaping at the right moments.

    I love Marie.

  • Maddy

    I loved that moment when Walt Jr told him to stop lying, and for a second I irrationally thought he overheard something, or Hank had gotten to him and I got all excited! Definitely interesting that even the character with the least information and the most positively disposed towards him can see through his charade at times.

  • ed newman

    That was an incredibly weak pump malfunction story. Walt Jr would have to be an idiot to take that story at face value.

  • emmalita

    Walt does think they are idiots. It was an incredibly weak story. I can think of two right now that would have been better. Walt is so used to getting away with stuff he expects to be believed no matter what.

  • ed newman

    I don't believe that he thinks Skyler is an idiot, and probably not Jr. either. He does think he is Isaac Newton, but in this case he just didn't have time to come up with a believable story. The pump thing was a Hail Mary. He was so poor at selling the lie because he knew it was full of holes.

  • emmalita

    I think at some level he does think Skyler and Walt Jr. are idiots. He keeps lying to Skyler when he doesn't need to. Back before he knew the shit was hitting the fan, he told Skyler the truth about who Lydia was. You could see him make the choice to be honest. In this episode it doesn't even occur to him to tell the truth. So yes, I do think he thinks everyone else is stupid enough to believe what ever lame lie he comes up with.

  • DarthCorleone

    I think the lies he chose to tell Skyler and the truths he chose to tell her at this point in the story depended entirely on the circumstance, regardless of how artful his fabrications are. Lying about the gasoline? Protecting Jesse. Lying about the gun in the vending machine? Protecting Skyler from potentially being an accessory to murder. Telling the truth about Lydia? Why not? Now that Skyler is in favor of sending Jesse to Belize, I don't think there's a reason for more lying. I just hope he was savvy enough to tell her about the lottery ticket that almost went up in flames.

  • chanohack

    I think he lied about the gasoline less to protect Jesse and more to present the illusion that he's still in control. He hates when Skyler thinks he's not the biggest dick in the biz. He only told her because she's onto him, and even then he could have told the truth without telling her who exactly did it.

  • Wigamer

    He's just convinced that he's so much
    smarter than everyone else. Ugh.

  • Sean

    That is the whole basis of his character. That he feels that he is the smartest person in the world. And almost all of the time, he is. But he has never grasped the reality that there is more to life than being the smartest.

  • nike

    Dont forget Saul knows all

  • nike

    No way can Jesse end up as a snitch and its starting to get complicated now he will see the light and end up as Walts savior there is no other way Hank is going to demand too much from Jesse and he is going to give Hank the finger.Hank is starting to be a bumbling fool if he thinks he has Jesse as his loyal servant after yelling at him after the civic square fiasco

  • Maddy

    I was kind of more annoyed with Walt pretending to be horrified at Skyler's suggestion. Don't get me wrong, I'm team Jesse all the way, and I think Hank was right when he said there is some evidence that Walt cares for him on some level. But dude, telling someone to calm down after their house nearly got burned down by someone who, at the very least, is emotionally unstable is a bit rich considering the people you've ACTUALLY killed. Call me a cynic, but Walt was always going to order a hit on Jesse, he just wanted to make it seem like he's still a good person because it was a last resort and avoid moral culpability - all part of his self-delusion. I don't think it's going to be as simple as he thinks though, and no way do I think that Jesse is going to die next episode (at least not by Todd's uncle).

  • googergieger

    Not a cynic, just wrong. He doesn't want to kill Jesse. He didn't/doesn't want to kill Hank. The people he has killed it was for a reason. He doesn't think he is a good person. He thinks he is a right person. Which not for nothing, but in his logic, his rules, and his world. He is a right person.

  • Jack Burton

    You do realize the lies upon lies he tells. That isn't right. That is...logically and factually speaking, WRONG. He does stuff to save his own ass. That's not logic. That's insanity and evil. So that tape he left for Hank and Marie, that was right because it was logical for him to come up with a fairy tale scheme of how Hank is really the meth Emperor? How is he a right person. He does evil things and will do anything, including lie about his cancer to his son to save his own ass.

  • Maddy

    I don't think he WANTS to kill Jesse but doesn't mean when it comes down to it he won't do it. That scene with Walt Jr made my skin crawl. He wants people to think he's a good person, he wants Jesse to look at him as a father figure and as 'Mr White', and he wants Walt Jr to have sympathy and love for him. He cares more about his appearance as a family man than actually being one in my opinion - but you can probably tell I am very anti Walter White!

  • googergieger

    I would reply, but I can't do it without accidentally insulting you. So, just read what I originally wrote in reply to you.

  • Maddy

    Fair enough! Your opinion is interesting!

  • ed newman

    He will definitely try to kill Jesse now that he has been directly threatened and even Walt can't delude himself into thinking that he can fix his relationship with Jesse.

    I think you are mostly right about Walt and how he wants Jr. and Jesse to feel about him. But I don't think he cares that others think he is a good person. He wants respect, admiration and fear from those outside his family, but not love.

  • Maddy

    True - there is definitely a part of him that loves the 'Heisenberg' persona and the fear and respect that brings him, but then he seems to backtrack and pretend like that's all an act when really Heisenberg is absolutely who he is. Don't know if that made any sense!

  • Fredo

    And that's what Jesse figured out last night. You want to get at Walter White, you expose him. You lift the lid on the facade and reveal the depths of his greed, depravity and ugliness. You rob him of his little world that he was building for his family and show him for the monster he is.

    Then, you sit back and wait, as he comes gunning for you.

  • googergieger

    What? Da fuck are you talking about? Expose him? Walter doesn't fucking know Jesse is working with Hank. Walt doesn't know Jesse wants to expose. Walt knows Jesse knows he used poison to make a kid look sick from ricin. He knows he tried to burn his house down and changed his mind for whatever reason. And now he knows Jesse said point blank, I'm going to come and get you at your real home, and where it really hurts. Which can mean any number of things.

    Walt is the guy that walked naked into a super market. He isn't afraid of exposure or embarassment. He is afraid of losing his money/empire. And he has an ego that will fuck him over more often than not. But none of this facade and depravity and ugly bullshit. None of this, he can't handle what kind of monster he is and let other people see it as well! Walt knows what he is. He fucking loves what he is. If he could keep his money, empire, and legacy, he'd build the worlds largest megaphone and never stop telling people about it.

  • GDI

    Sublime.
    Walt isn't afraid to get dirty; hell, I think he savors those moments. Think back to when he blew up Tuco's place, how that sense of power overwhelmed him when he got back to his car.
    It appears he gets an incredible high off having such precision and control of most situations that would cause weaker souls to crumble. There is no morality, there is only results for him. He's mechanical.

    In fact, his largest weakness is his ego. Walt thought he could control Jesse and Hank, and everything would be ok. If he had been as cold as Gus, he might have been able to control the situation better, at the cost of his last iota of his soul. It's a line that he has finally crossed. He truly is soulless.

    That shouldn't be mistaken as me saying, "oh, he's finally become awful, I hate him". He's always had a seed of evil. It's finally come to full bloom.

  • googergieger

    What crossed and what full bloom? He doesn't want to kill Jesse, now he has no choice. Even if it is in his mind. He didn't want to butt heads with Hank, but again he had no choice there. No evil. No good. No morals. Right and wrong. That's Walt. Maybe not us. But people should try to realize that is him.

  • googergieger

    This isn't meant to be insulting by the way. I have a monotoned voice in real life, so much like when people read my comments they have no idea how to take what I say.

  • Morgan_LaFai

    As far as "table setters" go, this was a pretty amazing episode. Not a lot actually happened but it set up one hell of a Mexican standoff. I think it would have been an cop out to have any of the three parties involved align with each other. But this, this set up is brilliant. Who will take down who first? And is the enemy of my enemy really my friend? Great questions rolling round in my head right now, and that's the way I like it.

  • Wendy Darling

    No no no. Walt does NOT want to kill Jesse. He could have done it a long time ago. He thinks of him as family and family is off limits. But he seems to think there's no other choice now. You saw how agonized he looked making that call. Didn't you?

  • Three_nineteen

    Walt cares about Jesse the way an abuser cares about his wife. Walt is very, very sad about how Jesse is forcing Walt to kill him by not doing exactly what Walt wants.

  • googergieger

    Because Jesse doesn't have a track record of going against what Walt wants and fucking shit up for everybody. What did Walt do in those situations again? Oh right, make excuses, fix up the messes, and forgive Jesse. Walt has been through a lot with Jesse. It isn't family or love, but it is a strong connection. Walt knows Jesse isn't a bad kid.

  • Jack Burton

    You're a sick puppy gieger. You are totally missing the point that Walt is making Jesse do things and Jesse is the bigger and better person so he does them. When it doesn't work out for Walt, he degrades Jesse until Jesse becomes self-destructive. Or he makes Jesse do something horrible and Jesse becomes self-destructive. Everything Walt does is for Walt. Bottom line. Everything. Everything. Repeat that to yourself because you aren't getting this at all. It's the entire point of the show. You seem to be defending Walt like some fucked up whackjob defending a fellow inmate. You act like everything Walt does is justified because he's Walt.

  • googergieger

    You didn't understand what I wrote. You enjoy the show in as superficial manner as possible, and are getting tremendously close to going on the ignore list, as I'm at the age where I just won't bother with people that aren't worth even the smallest of efforts.

  • Long_Pig_Tailor

    Sure, he covered for him in those instances, but those were situations in which he was pretty sure he could come out on top. I wouldn't go so far as to say that I think Walt planned to take out Fring from the get-go, but I'm sure that almost from the start he was confident that if he had to take him down, he could. So he'd go to bat for Jesse even as it appeared to us like he was then making an undefeatable enemy, meanwhile in Walt's mind he's confident he can handle it (even when that confidence shows itself by whimpering contrition and so on).

    Now, the only way he can save Jesse's ass is basically by sacrificing his own, which he is not going to do. To do anything for Jesse, he'd have to think he can take on the entire DEA, which he can't. Hank? Absolutely, he thinks he can take him. But not an entire agency. So Jesse has to go. There is absolutely a kind of care that's going on, but it is really in no way healthy. It's narcissistic and, yeah, kind of abusive.

  • googergieger

    Well, no. Rewatch the show if you have to. Walt was happy working for Gus. He was afraid of Gus. More importantly he respected Gus. Only when Walt was being phased out and such did he start butting heads with Gus.

    Seriously? Jesse is leaving Walt with no choice. Not saying Walt is right here, but I mean not for nothing for all this Walt is a monster and I'm one too for "defending" him, I do appear to be one of the few with enough empathy to get everyones point of view. I mean what fucking option is it for Walt to turn himself in? Seriously, save Jesse and fuck over his family? Make everything he did be for absoutely nothing? It is Walt or Jesse, now. Lots of blame goes to Walt, just as much blame should go to Jesse too. Seeing as he was the reason Walt had a falling out with Gus to begin with.

  • Jack Burton

    Wrong again. You're the person who needs to watch every episode over again. And enough with the God complex.

  • googergieger

    Not a reply to what I said.

  • Wigamer

    Yes. Nailed it.

  • Wendy Darling

    "Skyler’s suggestion to kill Jesse is not one iota more horrifying than Walt’s decision to poison a child as part of a frame-up.)"
    I think you meant to say it's not less horrifying. But it is. After all, Jesse is a meth-making murderer (but I love him!) whereas the innocent kid is and innocent kid.

  • Long_Pig_Tailor

    It's definitely less horrifying. If Skyler had all the cards, knew everything that Jesse's been through and all, then it might be equally horrifying, but the thing with Skyler is that she's actually doing what Walt always claims to be doing-- trying to protect her family. As far as she knows, Jesse is a lunatic junkie who will totally burn down a house that might have a baby in it. And her only recourse given her situation is to have him killed.

  • googergieger

    To be fair, it wasn't a fatal or all that serious poison was it? Just something to make the kid look really sick, no? And Jesse's problem has always been never thinking about how his actions can affect those around him. Heck a lot of the time just never owning up to the problems he created. I mean Walt could have helped Jane, but who got her back into drugs? Who went to NA meetings with the sole purpose of selling drugs to ex junkies? Who was the cause of a falling out with Gus? Walt had to save Jesse, which is what fucked up a great relationship he had with Gus. Heck even now. Hank has shown he just wants to take Walt down, no matter what. Does Jesse not see what will happen? He doesn't know Skyler is on board. He could easily guess Walt Jr and the baby are totally innocent and are going to be destroyed if Walt is. Heck beyond the whole suburbs kid rebelling against his perfect parents by being a burn out drug user, he more or less stole the house they had to repair because of him, for no other reason than to be a petty hurtful spoiled kid. Walt is bad, but Jesse isn't an innocent. Even if these last few episodes has made us see he regrets some of his actions now with the overacting.

  • bbmcrae

    "To be fair, it wasn't a fatal or all that serious poison was it? Just something to make the kid look really sick, no?"

    Congrats on sounding like a soulless monster!

    You are aware that the creator of Walter White himself thinks Walter is a horrible, awful person, right?

    The Walter White apologists are an odd and sad bunch...

  • GDI

    That third line really has no validity, as author authority shouldn't influence your opinion on a work, and ad hominem is just as sad.

    Now, the LD50 of convallotoxin (one of the active toxic compounds in lily of the valley) is 0.08mg/kg, which is insanely minute. However, Walt may have synthesized the convallotoxin to an estimated amount based on Brock's weight (120-130lbs, which amounts to 4-5mg of the toxin) and used a significantly of that amount to reduce lethality, but maintain the adverse reaction (my best guess, as I'm not the Heisenberg).

    Not that it isn't horrifying. It really is. But Walt is more nuanced than just some simple reduction to classic "evil".
    That is what makes him much worse; he is not a unidirectional force with the only intent of killing or making money. He had chances to opt out and step back, realizing that maybe he has gone too far. But he ignored the warning signs.

    It really is a tragedy in the grandest sense.

  • googergieger

    Yeah, I'll agree with that. I understand why people like Jesse more, because he isn't aware of what he is doing. He really doesn't think how his actions will affect those around him. Walt does, and decides if it is worth it. Easily. I think people like Jesse more because they see him as good and innocent, but I think the reason they see that is because they ignore the bad he does, because he doesn't have any malice or cold logic behind it. He just acts and seems to feel bad when things go wrong, and that is enough for people to love him. Especially when compared to Walt. I just have an odd empathy that allows me to see every point of view and way of thinking/being. Granted I don't sympathize with everyone, I just can understand most peeps/characters.

  • Jack Burton

    You make no sense. You can have empathy for Walt but that doesn't get rid of the fact the stuff he does is pure evil. And please, tell us more why we feel the way we do. Jesse doesn't feel bad when things go wrong...he feels bad when he does bad things. And if you like Walt more, you are probably a narcissist or mentally ill. Or really too stupid to understand the show. Sorry, that's all there is to it.

  • googergieger

    *jingles keys*

  • Wigamer

    Maybe not apologists as much as admirers.

  • googergieger

    That isn't a reply to any of what I said, tool. Walter is a horrible person. As is almost everyone else on this show. Apparently I'm one of the few who watches the show that actually fucking gets that.

  • Jack Burton

    No...Walt is the worst person by a mile. Hank isn't a bad person. Marie isn't a bad person. Jesse isn't a _bad_ person. He's done some horrible things because he felt cornered by Walt. Yeah I am not saying you are an apologist but I am reading a lot of twisted people who are. They are like "well it's Jesse's fault or Hank's fault because he took him there and Jesse cooked meth first". You guys are really sick in the head and are missing the whole point of the show. Jesse started out bad and is realizing he isn't and Walter started out good and realized that he wasn't that good, and in fact, doesn't even know how bad he is because he's a psychopath/sociopath take your pick. Walt destroys everything in his path like a cancer. He's become the cancer. Jesse is now the cure to Walter White. Jesse is now the calculating, poised person that Walt was when they started cooking. But back to you nimrods who are rooting for Walt. You do realize that Walt is the bad guy now and the writing and directing is meant for him to be that. I feel like people are looking for excuses to blame it on someone else like looking for reasons that Tony Soprano survived the last episode.

  • googergieger

    You watch and enjoy the show in a very superficial manner.

  • L.O.V.E.

    Gilligan is so brilliant with the Easter eggs.

    The book in the Schrader house, "Dutch", was to be an up close an d behind the scenes look of the "White House" during the Reagan war-on-drugs, but Reagan proved to be an enigma, leading to author to create a fictitious version of the man sitting in the White House.

  • junierizzle

    I didn't mind this episode at all. Each season has always built up to an incredible ending: Tucco showdown, Plane crash, Jesse killing Gayle, Face off, Hank finding out Walter's secret. I can't wait to see how they end this puppy.

  • Skyler is now Lady Heisenberg.

    “I am in blood
    Stepp'd in so far, that, should I wade no more,
    Returning were as tedious as go o'er.”

  • Becks

    I don't really think so. She may want Jesse dead but only because she can't have him arrested and she fears for the safety of her children. She doesn't know him like we know him so for her he's just some meth head, drug manufacturer who tried to burn her house down.

    She isn't poisoning 8-year-olds and dissolving the body of an innocent child as she whistles dixie.

  • chanohack

    Yeah, Skyler has hated Jesse for a long time now. Even when she started to realize that she and Jesse were sort of in the same situation as far as Walt calling the shots, she's probably always blamed him a little bit for the state of her family (and let's face it, if it weren't for Jesse, Walt may not have started cooking in the first place) and learning that he poured gasoline all over her house only confirms the feelings she's had for him all along-- he's dangerous and a little unhinged, and she doesn't want him anywhere near her family.

    But still. Skyler's crossing a line that she'd previously refused to cross. She's breaking bad, you guys.

  • MrWhirly

    The real blame belongs with Hank. If he hadn't brought Walt along on the raid in an act of testosterone-fueled chest thumping, Walt would never have seen Jessie climb out that window.

  • Fredo

    You're right that this was a table-setter, but it works so well because it's allowing us to consciously strip away the other possible options. "Why can't Jesse and Hank just tell everyone what they know?" Because without evidence, it's Jesse's word against Walt's -- and someone with Jesse's record versus a pillar of the community like Walt wouldn't stand a chance. "Why not just get evidence?" Of what? Walt isn't cooking meth. The millions are gone. Any improvement in the White's financial situation can be explained by the car wash.

    So how do you get at Walt? Jesse seems to have figured it out.

  • L.O.V.E.

    He needs to flush the money out. Everything Walt did was to build that nest egg for his family, just like Mike tried to do before Walt killed him. Jesse wants to kill Walt, but not before tracking down the blood money and destroying it. Destroy the money, you destroy the Heisenberg legacy and the whole reason Walt did all of this -- for his family.

    No one on this show has kept the money.

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