The 10 Best Recent Releases on Netflix Watch Instantly (2015)
film / tv / lists / guides / news / love / celeb / video / think pieces / staff / podcasts / web culture / politics / dc / snl / netflix / marvel / cbr

The 24 Best Netflix Movies Released Since 2012

By Dustin Rowles | Guides | November 7, 2015 | Comments ()

Screen Shot 2015-10-09 at 9.17.04 PM.jpg

If you want to catch up on great television, Netflix is a fantastic service. It has a ton of great options (here's the 15 best recent series on Netflix Instant) that will keep you occupied for months, if not years. The recent Netflix movie selection, however, often leaves something to be desired, particularly when it comes to more recent films. Netflix will often land three or four big movie titles each year, but the rest of their movie selection tends to be a lot of filler, and it's difficult to wade through it to find the best gems.

We here, however, like to keep a running list of the best, most recent movies on Netflix. Not just the movies that were recently released to the service, but movies that were released in theaters from the past three years. We update this page regularly, so feel free to check back if you're ever searching for a good recent release. At this point, we are only featuring films released in theaters during 2012 - 2015.

Welcome to Me (Watch Here) -- The story of such an imbalanced person is inherently fraught with dangers of caricaturization. But Wiig's Alice is a surprise-- she is delightful, yet brutally honest. These types of emotionally naïve roles are usually innocently virginal, but Alice is complexly and comically, though still realistically sexual, and very much an adult. Thanks to the weird darkly cartoonish version of humanity Wiig brings to the role-- and all her roles-- Alice is a person we want to spend 90 minute getting to know. The material supporting her may not always warrant it-- it may wander and even fall apart entirely at its most crucial moments, but it's honestly hard to notice, given who's at the helm. Hopefully Wiig will graduate on to stronger scripts soon, but she positively kills it with everything she's given to work with in the meantime.


Nightcrawler (Watch Here) -- Nightcrawler is a dark film, but it's not punishing or bleak. It's not the kind of movie you simply watch to appreciate for the themes and performances. It's also an entertaining and riveting thriller with a certain popcorn quality. Above all, however, it's Gyllenhaal's film, and he delivers another incredible performance in a string of incredible performances.

Beyond the Lights (Watch Here) -- Beyond The Lights takes a rather derivative, simplistic story and adds just enough freshness and intelligence (and music! The soundtrack is perfection) to make it rise to something far more interesting. It's built on a thoroughly conventional premise that in less skilled hands would be cause for eye-rolling, but under the capable, confident direction of Gina Prince-Bythewood, it flexes a little more muscle and becomes a picture that is far stronger and more enjoyable than the average hideously cheesy Nicholas Sparks garbage that we normally suffer through. It's a rare, welcome and much-needed departure from the genre, and was genuinely enjoyable to watch.


Fruitvale Station (Watch Here) -- There is a lot to recommend the film in some bold and interesting early scenes: it begins with a fine, realistic scene involving Grant (Michael B. Jordan) and his girlfriend Sophina (Melonie Diaz) arguing in bed: it articulates very well the dynamic between the two of them, between exasperation and tenderness, and lays out the film's themes of family and money, and how to be a good person. In our introduction to Oscar, he is a lively, combative presence with great reserves of charisma: he speaks fast, he is off-the-cuff and bright. A few more scenes -- including a lovely breakfast scene with the couple's daughter the next day -- add a few more assured brushstrokes to this picture . We gradually get a sense of the type of man Oscar is, through interactions with pretty much everyone he knows, in text messages he sends to everyone, phone calls, and encounters with strangers: the sense is of a conflicted, kind and generous man.


Life Partners (Watch Now) -- All of the praises that were deservedly showered on Bridesmaids should also be applied here. But Life Partners is so much more than a "new Bridesmaids," mostly because it has no interest in being that. Though that's what it will probably will be called, because while a strong female friendship is really the only connection, that's a rare enough element for it to stand out. What we really learned here is the Gillian Jacobs can carry the shit out of a movie. Leighton Meester is also fantastic, and the chemistry between the two is unbelievable (in just how absolutely believable it is). Adam Brody and the supporting cast-- Gabourey Sidibe and Beth Dover as Sasha's lesbian frenemies, and Kate McKinnon in one completely stolen scene-- round out a fully lived-in connected web. But Jacobs is something else.


Babadook (Watch Here) -- The Babadook is writer-director Jennifer Kent's first feature-length film. And that's absolutely insane. Her skill for film language, establishing set geography, developing tension, and creating complex characters is far beyond what you'd expect from a first-timer. The Babadook is damn-near perfect. And horror connoisseurs better take notice.

How to Train Your Dragon (Watch Here) -- How to Train Your Dragon 2 is a rare followup that not only lives up to the hype of the first movie but also manages, somehow, to surpass all expectations. The opening sequence will swiftly get you up to speed if you missed (or forgot what happened during) all of the events until now. The first film was a thrill-seeking ride about the Viking village Berk and how humans stopped hunting dragons and developed symbiotic relationships with these dangerous creatures. The sequel is just as captivating, except everything is king-sized instead of simply fun-sized. The animation is better. The first movie's visuals were uneven after suffering from some production blips, but the sequel is visually flawless.

Screen Shot 2015-02-04 at 2.40.19 PM.jpg

Chef (Watch Here) -- Jon Favreau has had a bit of a bumpy ride, hasn't he? After a bangarang career launch, complete with the catchiest catchphrases of the 90s, he found his way into the blockbustery people-pleasing business. And he's taken a lot of sh*t for that. The thing is, as a writer, director, and actor, Favreau has put out a lot of great work. But for every Swingers, there's a Couples Retreat. For every Iron Man, there's a Cowboys and Aliens. Even his best work these days is in the form of huge tentpole films. In watching those movies, you get absolutely no clue of who he is. He may have produced The Avengers, but his indie street cred of the '90s is long gone. That loss of artistry -- the accusations that Favreau has sold out and gotten soft (figuratively and physically) -- is the driving force behind Chef. The movie is clearly an autobiographical allegory, with Favreau casting himself as his own Mary Sue in the form of Carl Casper.

The Double -- For The Double, Richard Ayoade has invented a fascinating world. Somewhere between our own reality and a dystopian future, it feels like The Twilight Zone's version of what 2014 would look like. It's bleak and dark and vaguely Eastern European. The immediate influences abound. It's like David Lynch and Orson Welles threw a party for Charlie Chaplin. Dostoevsky was invited, naturally, since the movie is based on a novella of his, and he brought along Jean-Pierre Jeunet as his plus one. Still, though the film may immediately remind you of ten different things, it is spectacularly unique.

Snowpiercer (Watch Here) -- Chris Evans turns in an amazing performance as Curtis, the leader of a band of merry dystopian future revolutionaries. The Captain America movies only give you a hint of what a genuinely good actor he is--and now, between Snowpiercer and Sunshine, he's been in two of the best sci-fi movies from the past ten years. And let's not even talk about Iceman, where he manages to hold his own--even outperform, in some scenes--scenery-chewing dynamo Michael Shannon, for Chrissakes. And the wizard behind the curtain is Bong Joon-Ho, who directed the excellent Mother and The Host. The man is good.

Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa (Watch Here) -- Knoxville's heady combination of fearlessness and a complete lack of shame may put him on the sociopathic spectrum, but it also makes the Jackass movies one of the most enjoyable experiences you can have in a theater. Granted, I have absolutely dreaded each and every Jackass movie going in (and this is the third I have reviewed), but it never takes more than a few minutes for Knoxville and the gang to kick loose the movie snob from my bowels and elicit paroxysmal, almost lethal laughter out of me. If it's possible, Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa may be the funniest Jackass movie yet.

Short Term 12 (Watch Here) -- Brie Larson's Short Term 12 is more than just an unexpected delight, it has the potential to be the best independent film of 2013. It's an outstanding little movie about the power of emotional processing, about dealing with psychological trauma, and about the ways in which we cope. It is dizzyingly sweet, immensely heart-achey and anchored by one of the most nuanced and beautifully subtle performances in a very long while. Despite the subject material, however, Short Term 12 is not a maudlin film. It is peopled with determined and hopeful characters, and there's not an ounce of self-pity coursing through the narrative. It's my favorite kind of film: Good people who want to do good things, and nothing but kindness, humor, and warmth seep out of every frame.

The One I Love (Watch Here) -- The One I Love stars Mark Duplass and Elisabeth Moss. They play a married couple, but their marriage is troubled. They seek the assistance of a marriage counselor, played by Ted Danson, who recommends a weekend retreat in a cottage where he frequently sends couples. It has very good results. That is all that can be said about the plot of The One I Love, because all the ensuing revelations in the film should be experienced rather than described. I will only say that it's a film about identity, and about who we are, and how others perceive us, and how we perceive ourselves, and all the gaps between perceptions and realities.

Don Jon (Watch Here) -- There's a lot going on in Don Jon, and while not all of it works, that's also part of its appeal. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is clearly on fire to try something here, and he's written and directed an ambitious and awkward and occasionally clunky and often powerful movie about the way we lie to ourselves and what it takes to be honest with someone we love. It's not a new topic, but that's precisely why it's so strong. He's found a fresher way to get at something that pesters all of us, and in wrestling with ideas of authenticity and human connection, he's continuing on the path he's laying for himself one hard-carved brick at a time. Gordon-Levitt is determined to find new ways to forge relationships with the audience, and Don Jon is both a reflection of that desire and a solid execution of same. He has things he wants to say, and I want to listen.

Blue is the Warmest Color (Watch Here) -- At just under three hours, the French film Blue is the Warmest Color would seem, from the outside looking in, to be a journey into the sleepy realms of slow-cooked cinema. Not the case! Offering a surprising lightness (surprising because it's oftentimes melancholy), the film makes the time investment here well worth it, a finer relationship film you're unlikely to see all year.

Drinking Buddies (Watch Here) -- Drinking Buddies, starring Jake Johnson, is a screenwriters' nightmare, the complete opposite of the major studio screenplay-by-committee schemes. There was no script for Drinking Buddies. In fact, much of the cast -- which also includes the beautiful and crass Olivia Wilde, the charming and winsome Anna Kendrick, and Ron Livingston -- were only discussing the idea of doing the movie when the director, Joe Swanberg, shot them an email asked them to show up for filming a few days later. Credit the insane chemistry of the actors, their deft improvisational skills, a smart, original outline from Swanberg, and the inability of the actors to overthink the process for Drinking Buddies' ability to transcend not only conventional romantic comedy tropes but most mumblecore offerings and capture something real, relatable, and genuine. It is a magnificent film.

20 Underappreciated Gems Currently Playing on Netflix Instant

Side Effects (Watch Here) -- There are some good ideas and moments in Side Effects, most of them built around Law's character. The film continues Soderbergh's habit of taking a man known currently or formerly as a sex symbol (George Clooney, Tatum) and stripping them of their sexual power while forcing them to slowly lose their ability to persuade/seduce those around them. Part of this has always been a nod to the actors' off-screen personas; Soderbergh's been getting cuter with this since Ocean's 11, which not coincidentally used "introducing Julia Roberts" in its closing credits. Yet though these metafictional riffs are apparently a big part of the charge for Soderbergh, he's not just goofing around. He remains convinced, and rightly so, that sexuality and the human body are merely the entryway to much darker and more interesting ideas. Law's charm and charisma here become some of the tools of his own downfall, tools he doesn't even know he's wielding against himself until it's too late. In other words, Soderbergh's interested in people as people, not merely as objects that fit each other.


Happy Christmas (Watch Here) -- Joe Swanberg's follow-up to Drinking Buddies is aimless at times, and often represents what people dislike about mumblecore, but the cast -- led by Anna Kendrick and Melanie Lynskey -- keeps things light, enjoyable, and entertaining for the film's short duration.

Frank (Watch Here) It's a bizarre movie, mostly about how these oddball musicians bond together over their esoteric, unlistenable pop music. Frank is not without its merit. It's brimming with neat ideas and it is populated with absurdly funny moments, and the performances are good (especially Fassbender, who emotes more from beneath a mask than 80 percent of Hollywood actors). The film itself, however, remains defiantly impenetrable.

Fat Kid Rules the World (Watch Here) -- It would be so easy for Fat Kid Rules the World to take the easy way out. The film deals with high school terror, loneliness, and the frustrating way that caring for someone means giving them the power to break your heart: in other words, everything you've seen probably hundreds of times over. But Matthew Lillard, in his first turn as a director, taps into real pain and genuine joy in a deft exploration of the awkward relationship forged by two people who had given up on ever finding anything good in the world. What makes the film so wonderful is precisely the way it takes those old dramedy tropes and grounds them in utterly believable characters. These people are not archetypes, or examples. They come alive like the best film characters do, and you ache and celebrate with them at every turn. The script from Michael M.B. Galvin and Peter Speakman, based on the novel by K.L. Going, is hilarious and touching in equal measure, and the film thoroughly earns its uplifting ending.

Django Unchained (Watch Here) -- uentin Tarantino's Django Unchained works on two levels. The surface level is that of a simple revenge flick, of the wronged taking up arms in a mission of retribution. From that point of view, it's a movie that has been made a hundred times, usually with Clint Eastwood squinting into the sun as he quick draws. The movie works well in that genre. Played straight, it stands with the best of Western vengeance tales, spiced with Tarantino trademarks of ultraviolence, perfect music, and darkly humorous asides. But the fact that this particular version of the Man with No Name is a former slave cannot be overlooked. The implications of that, and the focus of the story on slavery itself, construct the film's second level and elevate it from effective genre film into something more.

Seeking a Friend for the End of the World (Watch Here) -- Seeking a Friend for the End of the World is not a love story. It's a meditation on life and on what it is we value. Do we cling to our routines even as we realize the pointlessness of it all, if only because it's those routines that we value? Do we throw caution to the wind, let our Ids run wild, and soak up as much hedonistic experience as possible before we expire? Or do we seek out comfort, someone with whom we can connect and bond as the lights dim on the survival of mankind. I know what I'd want, if the lights were about to go out on humanity, and Seeking a Friend offers the perfect vehicle for your very thoughts to wonder about that question.

Lawless (Watch Here) -- As a director, John Hillcoat seems drawn to stories of men willing to do increasingly horrible things to each other out of devotion to a twisted sense of honor. His latest film, Lawless, puts his characters' willingness to define their own worlds right in the title, but each of his movies has been about small clusters of society that create their own social order, from the wasteland survivors of The Road to the bandits and brutal cops of The Proposition. What makes these movies so good -- and what makes Hillcoat so good at telling these types of stories -- is the way he focuses less on the chaos of such legally unencumbered cliques and more on the dread that comes from never knowing how far the other guy will go. Lawless has some of the most unnerving scenes I've seen in a movie this year precisely because Hillcoat knows just how to make the most of the tension between what's happened and what might still occur. These men have no rules but their own, and even those change by the hour. Lawless takes place in the American south almost a century ago, but it may as well be Mars for all it resembles the world we know.

Silver Linings Playbook (Watch Here) -- Silver Linings Playbook carefully walks the line between reminding us of our own relentless obsessions and distancing us enough from the action to see the crazy that is ever so evident before us. A character drama for people who can handle being spoken to as adults, with a hefty dose of honesty.

Quartet (Watch Here) -- Quartet, on the surface, seems easy to dismiss as a film that your mum or grandma would love. Just a hint of the naughty, filled with familiar old faces and having to do with retired opera singers! Director Dustin Hoffman clearly understands how to tell a story through both word and visuals, and never attempts to show off, instead leading the audience and characters through a well-rounded journey. Quartet may not be flashy, but it's pretty damn delightful to watch.

Europa Report (Watch Here) -- Europa Report is everything I want out of my hard science fiction. It takes the science seriously, grounds it within the constraints of the real world and then wraps those ideas around human drama. This is a slow movie, and if you're looking for space action or alien horror, this just isn't the film for you. And that's okay.

DC Comics Shows To Shun Netflix and Hulu, as Well as Non-Cable Fans | Donald Trump Hosted an Embarrassing and Profoundly Pointless 'SNL'

Comments Are Welcome, Bigots and Trolls Are Not