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The Best Recent Movies on Netflix Right Now

By Dustin Rowles | Guides | April 22, 2017 | Comments ()

By Dustin Rowles | Guides | April 22, 2017 |


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If you want to catch up on great television, Netflix is a fantastic service. It has a ton of great options (here's the 15 best recent series on Netflix Instant) that will keep you occupied for months, if not years. The recent Netflix movie selection, however, often leaves something to be desired, particularly when it comes to more recent films. Netflix will often land three or four big movie titles each year, but the rest of their movie selection tends to be a lot of filler, and it's difficult to wade through it to find the best gems.

We here, however, like to keep a running list of the best, most recent movies on Netflix. Not just the movies that were recently released to the service, but movies that were released in theaters from the past three years. We update this page regularly, so feel free to check back if you're ever searching for a good recent release. At this point, we are only featuring films released in theaters during 2012 - 2016.

Updated April 6, 2017

Win It All (Watch Here) -- With Jake Johnson, the film easily swings back from the more visceral moments, never letting itself get bogged down. The rest of the cast, mostly with significantly smaller roles, carry their weight (has Keegan-Michael Key ever not?), but Joe Lo Truglio is a surprising stand-out. Win It All has a wonderful lived-in tone and style, thanks to how Swanberg films and edits his movies. It's tense, funny, well-structured and carried by strong performances.

I Don't Feel At Home in this World Anymore -- I Don't Feel at Home in This World Anymore starts slowly and contemplatively in one genre and crescendos until a hell of a final act that seems to take place in another genre altogether, one that has more in common with Jeremy Saulnier's Green Room (which featured Macon Blair in an acting role). However, the two genres play well together. Melanie Lynskey is -- as always -- superb, as she evolves into this generation's Parker Posey, while Elijah Wood continues a streak of oddball indie roles designed to ensure that no one ever finds him sexually appealing again. It's not an earth-shattering film, but it makes for solid Netflix fare for a Saturday night, and it's a must-see for the Lynskey enthusiasts among us.


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Secret Life of Pets (Available April 22nd) -- Dog lover or cat lover, kid or grown-up, you'll find plenty to relish in this deeply silly and sweet movie. But a quick warning to parents: The Secret Life of Pets might be a bit scary for more sensitive tykes. At my screening, one child was absolutely howling over a scene involving a massive, one-eyed, one-fanged viper, and an action-packed finale that threatened to sink our canine heroes into the East River.

Finding Dory (Watch Here) -- It's a solid outing for Pixar, but it's not in the same class as Zootopia or The LEGO Movie or Frozen. When it comes to Pixar, even in the money-grabbing sequel era of the studio, we expect more. Dory is good, but it's not Pixar good, and after Inside Out, we know they're still capable of it.

The BFG (Watch Here) -- Spielberg's new muse, Mark Rylance, is excellent in the role of the Big Friendly Giant, while Ruby Barnhill is everything you have come to expect in the child actors of Spielberg movies. She turns in a splendid put-her-in-your-pocket performance. In fact, the entire movie is splendid. When it comes to Spielberg, however, we often expect more than splendid. We expect greatness.

Clouds of Sils Maria (Watch Here)-- Clouds of Sils Maria is not for the casual moviegoer. It is too abruptly cerebral to please. But if you're an Assayas fan, you'll likely be thrilled. If you're a Stewart fan, you'll want to see it to add to your evidence that she's an undervalued actress. And if you think Binoche can do no wrong, her performance here will give you further reason for worship. Just don't anticipate a jaunty showbiz story. Clouds of Sils Maria has a lot of thoughts on Hollywood, but little patience for its rules.

It Follows (Watch Here) -- I like the idea of leaving the monster ambiguous--it doesn't matter what it is, it doesn't matter what it wants, it just matters that it wants to kill you, holy shit--but this movie needs something else to beef it up, whether a dose of monster mythology, some indication that the baddie isn't invincible (even if horror movie villains have a tendency to pop back up again--like daisies!--after each KO, for the sake of suspense you generally have to believe they could be killed), or main characters who actually take initiative instead of running around being useless for an hour and 40 minutes. Then it might have deserved its hype. As it is, It Follows is miles and away better than a lot of the low-budget horror that abuses the eyeballs of genre fans, but it's not good enough to be worth the time of people who aren't already into horror (like The Babadook is). It's a lazy day Netflixer.

Paddington (Watch Here) -- This right here is a charming story. Ben Whishaw brings a jolly whimsy to the little brown bear who is considered little more than a bother by the blustery Mr. Brown (Downton Abbey's Hugh Bonneville). But Mrs. Brown (the always affable Sally Hawkins) is charmed by this unusual orphan, and their children--the inventive Jonathan (Samuel Joslin) and the jaded Judy (Madeleine Harris)--are intrigued. Paddington comes into their home, and makes the mess teased in trailers, but also manages to help these four and the loopy maid Mrs. Bird (Julie Walters) find common ground. Amid gags that are sure to make kids chuckle and lots of cute moments of Paddington being a silly bear, there are some bits of wit sure to appeal to adults as well. It's entertaining and adorable.

White Girl (Watch Here) -- White Girl is dedicatedly deplorable in its decadence and riveting in its rawness. The cinematography, rich with suffocating close-ups, ratchets up the tension through unforgiving proximity. All past tales of girls lost to the terrible big city instantly imbue the film with dramatic weight. But how Wood plays both out to a uniquely unsettling finale is pioneering, thought provoking, and more than a little haunting.

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Boyhood (Watch Here) -- For a story as simple as this, let's simplify this review: Boyhood is the best film I've seen this year. It may well be the best film I've seen in several years. Initially, I wondered if it affected me so strongly because of my newfound fatherhood, but it's so much more than that. It's a lovely film, so much so that even its flaws -- mostly due to the inexperience of the young actors in their early years -- are perfectly woven into the tapestry of the film itself. It makes them less like flaws and more like slight imperfections in the fabric, human touches that allow the audience to reflect on all of the work and effort and love that became a part of a truly wonderful film.

The Jungle Book (Watch Here) -- list. It's not for little ones because the action sequences are too intense, but that's exactly what makes it so thrilling for adults. It is a phenomenal film that hews closely to the Rudyard Kipling source material, but brings in a few surprises to differentiate it and yet never veers far away from the spirit of the book. It's engaging from the first frame to the last, and breaks up the intensity with enough humor to keep us from dwelling too much on the terrors of the jungle.

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Zootopia (Watch Here) -- Sure to speak to kids and grown-ups alike, Zooptopia unfolds a poignant lesson about how prejudice can hurt people, but also how it can be overcome. And it does all this in a wonderfully fun film with big laughs, clever casting (did I mention Kristen Bell has a cameo as a sloth?), and delightful animation that boasts photo-real textures, telling physicality, and undeniable verve. And as a bonus: Zootopia sets up a charismatic critter partnership that could easily carry a thrilling and fun animated franchise I'd actually be happy to see.

The Imitation Game (Watch Here) -- The Imitation Game is, beyond all else, an ambitious movie. It tackles a huge number of Very Important Issues: World War II code breakers, secret government agencies, Soviet spies, scientific breakthroughs, social outcasts, possible Asperger's/autism, repressed homosexuality, oppression and persecution... there is no end to the grandness of this movie. And to its credit, the movie navigates all these issues surprisingly well. To do so, there's definitely a simplification, a glossing over, of the entire story. And what a story it is. Turing's life was a remarkable one, and it seems a crime to skip over or condense any part of it. But this is filmmaking, and that's the way it goes. Still, due to a quick pace and a spectacular cast, the whole thing works. It is as heartbreaking as it set out to be, with enough laughs to actually be a (very, very depressing) crowd-pleaser.

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St. Vincent (Watch Here) -- A lot of things are being said about St. Vincent: that it's formulaic, it's been done, that it's schmaltzy, saccharine drivel. And while I can't tell you that those things aren't true, I will tell you that I don't care. Not one bit. I didn't care while I was watching the movie, genuinely laughing and also crying far more than I feel comfortable with in public, and I don't care now, looking back with the advantage of cynical hindsight. Despite all its shortcomings, St. Vincent manages to still be sweet (not saccharine, I'd argue), moving, and entirely engaging. All of that is due, of course, to Bill F*cking Murray.

Little Prince (Watch Here) -- Considering this French/Canadian movie was demoted from a US theatrical run to a Netflix release, I suspected The Little Prince might be some clunky substandard fare. Clunky, a bit, but in the lovable way of Terry Gilliam fairy tales, which chase down curious characters instead of getting too caught up in plot. Substandard? Far from it. Osborne integrates various animation aesthetics in the storytelling, making this fun film visually sumptuous. The animation used for the girl's world has soft edges, and muted colors, while that of the pilot's stories are vibrant hues, and characters folded as if animated origami. The novella's watercolor illustrations come to life on the pages the pilot sends into the girl's bedroom as carefully crafted airplanes. And as the Little Prince becomes more and more real to her, the animation evolves to something bright but more dimensional. It's richly designed, and gorgeous.

The Big Short (Watch Here) -- Based as it is on a non-fiction book by Moneyball author Michael Lewis, The Big Short is fairly inside baseballer-y (ba-doom-ch), with industry terms like "CDO," "synthetic CDO" and "tranches" thrown around willy-nilly. Thankfully, McKay (who co-wrote the script) leans into the fact that very few people watching this movie will know what the fuck is going on, obliterating the fourth wall at times so characters and celebrities on cameo duty can explain what the fuck a sub-prime mortgage is. It livens up a potentially dull subject, and it's also a gentle dig at how little your average person knows or even cares about the financial systems that ultimately rule their lives. "I know the phrase 'mortgage-backed security' makes your eyes glaze over, so here's Margot Robbie in a bathtub."

Adult Beginners (Watch Here) -- Aimless but utterly charming, Nick Kroll stars as Jake, a man in his mid-30s whose start-up goes belly-up and he is forced to move back home with his sister (Rose Byrne) to reset and ultimately find himself. The living arrangement, however, creates some friction when Jake finds out his sister's husband (Byrne's real-life partner, Bobby Cannavale) is sleeping around. Adult Beginners is modest, amusing, and a genuinely decent movie with a cast with chemistry to spare. It's the perfect for movie background watching. It also features a rarity in the career of Nick Kroll: A role in which he is not a douchebag.

Tangerine (Watch Here)-- On its surface, this LGBT dramedy sounds like it's bound to be chock-full of embarrassing backwards stereotypes. Set in Hollywood on Christmas Eve, it follows a pair of transgender sex workers, one who is hunting down her boyfriend/pimp over rumors he strayed while she served time, the other desperately seeking an audience for her cabaret show that night. Along the way, these broke bffs collide with eye-rolling cops, slur-spewing bro-dudes, and skeezy johns, including a cab driver with a complicated family life (to put it lightly). It sounds sordid, but writer/director Sean Baker's approach and his electric ensemble cast offer an unapologetic frankness and surprisingly jolly humor making for an unconventional holiday movie that's fascinating, funny and humane. Bonus: you can stream it on Netflix.--Kristy Puchko


The Scariest Movies on Netlfix

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Beasts of No Nation
After awing critics and audiences with the moody marvel that was True Detective season one, director Cary Joji Fukunaga dove into the ambitious adaptation of Uzodinma Iweala's harrowing novel about a young boy forced into the grim life of a child soldier. It's a topic that could easily have gone into soul-crushingly dark territory, but Fukunaga's sharp script threads humanity and hope throughout, leading the audience as it does the film's pint-sized protagonist played by mesmerizing newcomer Abraham Attah. His face spikes with pain and fear as his narration gives voice to this child lost in war and made plaything to a charismatic and cruel warlord. Idris Elba deftly channels his alarming charms into this vile villain, making for a purposefully jarring experience. As for Attah, his performance feels so effortless and natural, you might forget you're watching a narrative film as opposed to a documentary. Beasts of No Nation is brutal, beautiful and streaming on Netflix. Don't miss it.--Kristy Puchko

Europa Report (Watch Here) -- Europa Report is everything I want out of my hard science fiction. It takes the science seriously, grounds it within the constraints of the real world and then wraps those ideas around human drama. This is a slow movie, and if you're looking for space action or alien horror, this just isn't the film for you. And that's okay.


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Nightcrawler (Watch Here) -- Nightcrawler is a dark film, but it's not punishing or bleak. It's not the kind of movie you simply watch to appreciate for the themes and performances. It's also an entertaining and riveting thriller with a certain popcorn quality. Above all, however, it's Gyllenhaal's film, and he delivers another incredible performance in a string of incredible performances.

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Fruitvale Station (Watch Here) -- There is a lot to recommend the film in some bold and interesting early scenes: it begins with a fine, realistic scene involving Grant (Michael B. Jordan) and his girlfriend Sophina (Melonie Diaz) arguing in bed: it articulates very well the dynamic between the two of them, between exasperation and tenderness, and lays out the film's themes of family and money, and how to be a good person. In our introduction to Oscar, he is a lively, combative presence with great reserves of charisma: he speaks fast, he is off-the-cuff and bright. A few more scenes -- including a lovely breakfast scene with the couple's daughter the next day -- add a few more assured brushstrokes to this picture . We gradually get a sense of the type of man Oscar is, through interactions with pretty much everyone he knows, in text messages he sends to everyone, phone calls, and encounters with strangers: the sense is of a conflicted, kind and generous man.

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Life Partners (Watch Now) -- All of the praises that were deservedly showered on Bridesmaids should also be applied here. But Life Partners is so much more than a "new Bridesmaids," mostly because it has no interest in being that. Though that's what it will probably will be called, because while a strong female friendship is really the only connection, that's a rare enough element for it to stand out. What we really learned here is that Gillian Jacobs can carry the shit out of a movie. Leighton Meester is also fantastic, and the chemistry between the two is unbelievable (in just how absolutely believable it is). Adam Brody and the supporting cast-- Gabourey Sidibe and Beth Dover as Sasha's lesbian frenemies, and Kate McKinnon in one completely stolen scene-- round out a fully lived-in connected web. But Jacobs is something else.

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Babadook (Watch Here) -- The Babadook is writer-director Jennifer Kent's first feature-length film. And that's absolutely insane. Her skill for film language, establishing set geography, developing tension, and creating complex characters is far beyond what you'd expect from a first-timer. The Babadook is damn-near perfect. And horror connoisseurs better take notice.

How to Train Your Dragon (Watch Here) -- How to Train Your Dragon 2 is a rare followup that not only lives up to the hype of the first movie but also manages, somehow, to surpass all expectations. The opening sequence will swiftly get you up to speed if you missed (or forgot what happened during) all of the events until now. The first film was a thrill-seeking ride about the Viking village Berk and how humans stopped hunting dragons and developed symbiotic relationships with these dangerous creatures. The sequel is just as captivating, except everything is king-sized instead of simply fun-sized. The animation is better. The first movie's visuals were uneven after suffering from some production blips, but the sequel is visually flawless.

Minions (Watch Here) -- Sandra Bullock and Jon Hamm have a quirky chemistry as married super villains Scarlett and Herb Overkill. Her frantic energy channels into an increasingly harried, and delightfully feminine super villain, whose dresses pack more weapons than Iron Man's suit. The animators have a lot of fun with her dangerous couture, and so will you. There's also a brief appearance by a wacky family that boasts voice work by some of my personal favorites, Michael Keaton and Allison Janney. Jennifer Saunders pops in to lend her voice to a playful take on Queen Elizabeth II. And the B-plot, which follows those Minions left behind as they struggle through their ennui, is surprisingly funny. There's just something about maudlin Minions attempting apathetic cheer squad routines.

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Chef (Watch Here) -- Jon Favreau has had a bit of a bumpy ride, hasn't he? After a bangarang career launch, complete with the catchiest catchphrases of the 90s, he found his way into the blockbustery people-pleasing business. And he's taken a lot of sh*t for that. The thing is, as a writer, director, and actor, Favreau has put out a lot of great work. But for every Swingers, there's a Couples Retreat. For every Iron Man, there's a Cowboys and Aliens. Even his best work these days is in the form of huge tentpole films. In watching those movies, you get absolutely no clue of who he is. He may have produced The Avengers, but his indie street cred of the '90s is long gone. That loss of artistry -- the accusations that Favreau has sold out and gotten soft (figuratively and physically) -- is the driving force behind Chef. The movie is clearly an autobiographical allegory, with Favreau casting himself as his own Mary Sue in the form of Carl Casper.

The Double -- For The Double, Richard Ayoade has invented a fascinating world. Somewhere between our own reality and a dystopian future, it feels like The Twilight Zone's version of what 2014 would look like. It's bleak and dark and vaguely Eastern European. The immediate influences abound. It's like David Lynch and Orson Welles threw a party for Charlie Chaplin. Dostoevsky was invited, naturally, since the movie is based on a novella of his, and he brought along Jean-Pierre Jeunet as his plus one. Still, though the film may immediately remind you of ten different things, it is spectacularly unique.

Short Term 12 (Watch Here) -- Brie Larson's Short Term 12 is more than just an unexpected delight, it has the potential to be the best independent film of 2013. It's an outstanding little movie about the power of emotional processing, about dealing with psychological trauma, and about the ways in which we cope. It is dizzyingly sweet, immensely heart-achey and anchored by one of the most nuanced and beautifully subtle performances in a very long while. Despite the subject material, however, Short Term 12 is not a maudlin film. It is peopled with determined and hopeful characters, and there's not an ounce of self-pity coursing through the narrative. It's my favorite kind of film: Good people who want to do good things, and nothing but kindness, humor, and warmth seep out of every frame.

Blue is the Warmest Color (Watch Here) -- At just under three hours, the French film Blue is the Warmest Color would seem, from the outside looking in, to be a journey into the sleepy realms of slow-cooked cinema. Not the case! Offering a surprising lightness (surprising because it's oftentimes melancholy), the film makes the time investment here well worth it, a finer relationship film you're unlikely to see all year.




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Frank (Watch Here) It's a bizarre movie, mostly about how these oddball musicians bond together over their esoteric, unlistenable pop music. Frank is not without its merit. It's brimming with neat ideas and it is populated with absurdly funny moments, and the performances are good (especially Fassbender, who emotes more from beneath a mask than 80 percent of Hollywood actors). The film itself, however, remains defiantly impenetrable.

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Seeking a Friend for the End of the World (Watch Here) -- Seeking a Friend for the End of the World is not a love story. It's a meditation on life and on what it is we value. Do we cling to our routines even as we realize the pointlessness of it all, if only because it's those routines that we value? Do we throw caution to the wind, let our Ids run wild, and soak up as much hedonistic experience as possible before we expire? Or do we seek out comfort, someone with whom we can connect and bond as the lights dim on the survival of mankind. I know what I'd want, if the lights were about to go out on humanity, and Seeking a Friend offers the perfect vehicle for your very thoughts to wonder about that question.



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Dope -- Dope is a smart, funny, inventive look at a coming-of-age tale, framed within a caper flick. It's wild and weird and goofy, led by Malcolm in an unusually quiet, nuanced, steady tone regardless of the hijinks on the screen (though he does have his moments of craziness). It's clearly a labor of love, and the project is backed by a variety of big names -- producers and executive producers include Forrest Whitaker, Pharrell Williams, and Sean Combs. It's an ambitious, rambunctious, wildly inconsistent and often messy film that needs some parts trimmed and others expanded. But it doesn't matter. Dope has enough wonder and brilliance, ambition and humor, and perhaps most of all love in it to easily outweigh its flaws.



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