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Twitter Users Ponder Which Films They Have Changed Their Minds On

By Petr Knava | Social Media | March 15, 2021 |

By Petr Knava | Social Media | March 15, 2021 |


twitter-film-change-opinion-header.jpg

I love art that isn’t easy. That doesn’t spoon feed the audience. Whether it’s dense, multilayered albums, or complex, challenging cinema, or tough, uncompromising literature. That’s not to say I revel in pretension. There’s a sizeable gulf between something that is made in a complicated way purely to satiate the artist’s ego, and meaningful, emotionally true art that just happens to be complex. You can usually tell the difference. Though it’s also true that sometimes there can be an overlap between the two. Art. What a trip!

I bring this up because I saw this tweet from filmmaker Isabel Sandoval (Lingua Franca), that asked people to ponder films that they have changed their minds on with time:

I like this prompt a lot because it’s so interesting to think about what works for people and when. I went to see Drive in the cinema when it was released and I absolutely adored it immediately. I’ve seen it several times since and my admiration for Nicolas Winding Refn’s meditatively violent nean dream has only grown. On the other hand, there’s the Coen Brothers’ masterpiece, No Country For Old Men. When I left the cinema after first seeing what would become one of my favourite films of all time, I wasn’t over the moon with it. I loved parts of it, and I could appreciate the obvious craft on show, but the whole didn’t completely sit with me until a few days later when something clicked and I was suddenly knocked back in awe at the greatness on show. Now that’s not exactly hate changing into love like Sandoval’s tweet is asking for, but it was the first thing that came to my mind, and I think it serves as a decent extension of the point in my opening paragraph: The best art is the stuff that makes you work a bit. That makes you meet it halfway. That doesn’t necessarily reveal itself to you fully until you’ve let it sit with you for a while, or maybe even until after a re-watch (or two). Some films this has happened to me with recently are Lemohang Jeremiah Mosese’s This Is Not a Burial, It’s a Resurrection, Éric Rohmer’s The Green Ray, and Aki Kaurismäki’s Lights in the Dusk. I think all are great now, but it took a little while before I got to that place.

Anywho, here are some of Twitter’s responses to Sandoval’s prompt, and again it’s so funny to see how different people experience things, because there are a number of films listed here that I just loved immediately:

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Petr is a staff contributor. You can follow him on Twitter.



Header Image Source: FilmDistrict