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ezra-miller-flash-recast.jpg

‘The Flash’ Director Won’t Recast Ezra Miller for a Sequel (Oh?)

By Mike Redmond | Pajiba Love | May 30, 2023 |

By Mike Redmond | Pajiba Love | May 30, 2023 |


ezra-miller-flash-recast.jpg

Obviously, it behooves Warner Bros. Discovery to pretend like The Flash is an integral piece of DC Universe canon that won’t immediately recast its main character the second they’re no longer needed to shoulder a potential blockbuster that could make the studio at least some of its money back, or dare to dream, break even. That said, director Andy Muschietti just took things to a whole new level by announcing that he won’t recast Miller if the film gets a sequel. Granted, that’s a huge “if” considering the film is already tracking for a soft opening, but that would certainly put to bed theories that The Flash ends with a new Barry Allen. Goddamn, Warner Bros. (Variety)

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