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Jennifer Aniston Inexplicably Threw Jamie Foxx Under the Bus

By Dustin Rowles | Celebrity | August 7, 2023 |

By Dustin Rowles | Celebrity | August 7, 2023 |


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Over the weekend, Jamie Foxx posted to Instagram (and later deleted), “They killed this dude name Jesus… What do you think they’ll do to you? #fakefriends #fakelove.” On Saturday morning, my wife read me the tweet, and, as a Southerner, my first thought was, “I didn’t know that Jamie Foxx was that Christian.” On the other hand, my wife — whose job it is to acknowledge and call out antisemitism — saw the message for what it could potentially mean, the antisemitic trope, the historical echoes of “they killed Jesus” and how it has been used to justify violence against Jews, and still gave Jamie Foxx the benefit of the doubt (but was also relieved that he apologized).

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We’ve been talking a lot lately about how we shouldn’t put celebrities on pedestals and not to be surprised when they turn out to be bad actors, but that doesn’t mean we can’t give someone who deserves it the benefit of the doubt. If a Republican politician had said that, or if Kanye had said that (notwithstanding the usual meaning of that phrase in Black culture), it might have been safe to assume there was antisemitism involved.

But, y’all: Jamie Foxx has been in the business for 35 damn years. He’s made some good movies, and he’s made some bad movies. That’s about all we know about the man. He is so intensely private that he was “rumored” to have dated Katie Holmes for six years, and earlier this year, he had what was clearly a life-threatening health condition, and we still don’t know what it was. We don’t know a damn thing about Jamie Foxx. There was no reason to assume the worst unless and until he doubled down, refused to acknowledge how it could be perceived out of context, or otherwise gave us a reason not to assume the worst. The man apologized and deleted the tweet as soon as he recognized that it could be perceived as antisemitic. There’s an argument to be made that he didn’t owe anyone an apology, which is true, but also, I respect that he did and appreciate that he acknowledged how it could be misinterpreted outside of his cultural context.

But Jennifer Aniston, who liked Jamie Foxx’s original Instagram post but “not on purpose or by accident,” was quick to call out Foxx before he’d issued the apology. “This really makes me sick,” she posted. “And, more importantly, I want to be clear to my friends and anyone hurt by this showing up on their feeds - I do NOT support any form of antisemitism. And I truly don’t tolerate HATE of any kind. Period.”

It was Jennifer Aniston who turned Foxx’s, “Oops. I posted something that could be seen as antisemitic but apologized as soon as I realized it,” into the viral story that it became. Should you call out antisemitism when you see it? Absolutely! But it’s also OK to take a beat. You know that she saw the OG post and liked it on purpose because she didn’t recognize any antisemitism in it. She didn’t see it, and he didn’t mean it. It was only after she got called out that she decided to assume it was intentional on Jamie Foxx’s part and throw him under the bus (#fakefriends). She made it about herself because she was afraid of being canceled because she assumed the worst after she was told by other people on social media to assume the worst.

The lesson here? Don’t put celebrities on pedestals. But also, it’s OK not to immediately assume the worst every single time. As always, it’s also OK to say nothing, or at least wait a minute before you do.