MARVEL / LIVEBLOGGING THE 90s / CELEBRITY FACTS / MINDHOLE BLOWERS / NETFLIX



'Breaking Bad' — 'Granite State': Last Call

By Daniel Carlson | TV Reviews | September 23, 2013 | Comments ()


breaking-bad-granite-state.jpg

A lot of critics weren’t wild about Breaking Bad when it debuted. Some were put off, others were on the fence, but just about all of them felt that there wasn’t as much there as they’d hoped. It’s tempting to look back and laugh, or to chide those critics for somehow missing the arrival of what’s become one of the most revered and talked-about shows of the modern golden age. But the truth is that none of those reviews could ever hope to be accurate. They were, by their very definition, hobbled and pointless pieces. Reviews of new (or even youngish) series are, by necessity, going to fail to do what criticism can do under better circumstances, which is to explore the execution and themes of a work of art and discuss everything from cultural relevance to trends to emotional resonance and so on. It’s not that TV critics don’t want to talk about these things. It’s that, early in a show’s run, or when looking at a new series, it’s impossible to actually talk about any of that because the show hasn’t been around long enough yet. It has not yet had the opportunity to stand or fall, to deliver on its promises or to fail to connect the dots. A film or a book or an album is a contained thing, a work of art and commerce that can be explored and talked about as a singular unit. But a TV series always grows and changes with age. Breaking Bad boasted an amazing pilot and a killer first season, but it wasn’t possible to really see what was happening — to really explore and understand and sit in awe of what Vince Gilligan and co. were doing — for a couple years, easy. A complex, developing work building toward an unseen future? No way anybody could have known what would happen. Those early reviews weren’t pointless because they were bad reviews; they were pointless because they could never have been good. The only way to know what will happen in an ongoing TV series — to really know if it’ll be worth your time or not — is to just wait and see.

And so now, as we come just a little closer to the end of Breaking Bad, questions like that continue to haunt me. I write about the show every week, and I’m fortunate because it’s one of my favorites and one of the few series I actually watch. Yet in the same way that early reviews were blindered by not knowing where the show would go, I worry that reviews of later episodes or seasons can once again become so hung up on trying to anticipate the show’s move and fill in those gaps we haven’t yet reached that we miss out on the experience of watching a masterful story unfold. I worry because I’m as guilty of this as anyone. Part of it’s natural, the same kind of water-cooler talk people have been having for generations about television. Wondering what will happen is part of the game, and a defining aspect of the experience of having your story doled out in little chunks over weeks, months, and years. But it’s so, so easy to transition from viewer to consumer, and to treat the work in question like nothing more than raw content waiting to be turned into a meme. I don’t want to do that. Not like this. There are movies and TV series and books and songs that I love, that fucking shape the walls of who I am, and I am terrified of treating them like gimmicks created for sarcastic summation and disposal. I work at it all the time, and I fail as much as I succeed, and I don’t know what to do but keep trying.

“Granite State” was a great episode. Of course it was. It was written and directed with the acumen we’ve long since come to expect from Breaking Bad, and it marched steadily toward a cloudy but damning future for the characters who’ve survived this long. The pieces were all there, as were all the themes the show’s been working with for years. There was Todd, doing his best to assume the mantle of Walter White, right down to the button-down shirt for his meeting with Lydia and his blunt but no less manipulative means of keeping Jesse in check. There was Walter White, lonely and struggling, scrambling out of the dirt like he’s been doing every step of the way since he went on a ride-along with Hank and saw Jesse jump from a second-story bedroom window. There was the constancy of the crime world, and how Jack and Todd are mercilessly moving into Walt’s territory the same way he moved into Gus Fring’s. There was that world’s cruel randomness, too, as Jack and Todd dispatched of people like Andrea with gut-churning ease, underlining just how fragile was the claim Walt made for the throne. There was the way director Peter Gould kept the viewer locked in with Walt, cut off from the world, forced to learn about Skyler and the manhunt through terse updates from Saul’s fixer (a great appearance from Robert Forster). And there was Jesse: poor Jesse, a dumb but mostly harmless kid who went for a walk with the devil and has been lost ever since. It was all there, and I could feel myself frantically unpacking it even as I lamented every passing minute, knowing when the hour ended I’d only have one left.

Some of the best grace notes of the episodes were the little reminders that, even though it’s been on the air since January 2008, less than two years have passed in the story’s world. Seeing Principal Carmen in her office, or Gretchen and Elliott on Charlie Rose, is both a charge for viewers and totally normal for the characters. It would have been weirder if Gould had made a bigger show of reintroducing Carmen, or acting like Gretchen and Elliott were anything other than the recurring thorn in Walter’s side. And I remain stunned by how casually evil Todd can be. He’s a distilled Walter White, all goal and no soul, and just as enamored of the idea of endless riches. Jack even tried to wave him off, pointing out (pretty reasonably for a cold-blooded killer in his own right) that they’d just cleared tens of millions in cash and didn’t need to worry about peddling crystal anymore. Todd’s reply was only a slightly more extreme version of Walt’s m.o.: “This is millions, Uncle Jack,” he said of the still unproduced meth. “No matter how much you got, how do you turn your back on more?”

Maybe it’s fitting that the penultimate episode of one of the most finely crafted series in recent memory aired against the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards, at which Breaking Bad won in some categories but lost in others. Do those wins or losses change the show? Does the amount of hardware we can attach to it alter its value or impact? Does the presence or absence of another statue on actor’s shelf diminish the emotional journey we’ve taken? No. Of course not. Suggesting so would be silly. I want to try my hardest to keep that in mind next week and in the months to come, when Breaking Bad the show starts to become Breaking Bad the tangible commodity, the yardstick, the watchword, the litmus test, the shibboleth, the game, and the forgotten. I want to watch what happens, and to love it or hate it for what it is, and to hold onto it. I don’t want to forget the story. More importantly, I don’t want to forget that the story is the journey, and that it’s not just about what happens at the end, but about how we get there.

Daniel Carlson is the managing editor of Pajiba and a member of the Houston Film Critics Society and the Online Film Critics Society. You can also find him on Twitter.



Are you following Pajiba on Facebook or Twitter? Because every time you do an angel does the Paul Rudd dance

Around the Web


13-Year-Old Young Lady Would Like You To Kickstart Her Horror Heart: 'Carver' Needs You. | The 2013 Emmys: Just Let Tina and Amy Host Already (and Maybe Pick the Winners, Too)





Comments Are Welcome, Jerks Will Be Banned


  • knockloud

    Really, though, Jesse's paperclip escape plan started out just like Walt's great coffee-pot escape from Mike in "Say My Name." Jesse's shown some remarkable drive and quick thinking when he wants to, but like he told Hank & Gomie, Walt's not just smarter than them, he's luckier than them. And part of me wonders if Todd, in his creepy robot way, thinks he's doing Jesse a favor by sparing his life.

  • emmalita

    I wonder about that. If someone else thought they were doing Jesse a favor, they would likely be angry and feel like the escape attempt was a betrayal. Todd has never once shown anger. I think he has a simplistic carrot and stick approach, but without ego. Sort of the worst Buddhist ever.

  • Tenacious_EJ

    I was waiting for Uncle Jack to end Todd after seeing Jesse's confession video about Todd murdering that innocent kid. I was expecting these terrible men to have something that resembled humanity, and they were found lacking. They are evil incarnate, and I can only assume Walt's bought that machine gun to dispatch them. Like Gretchen said, Walter White is gone, Heisenberg only remains, and Heisenberg is all of Walt's bad with none of the good- evil incarnate himself. Its been a hell of a ride.

  • Bear_Style

    I am not sure why everybody is talking about Walt all of the sudden becoming a Navy SEAL and being able to kill an entire Nazi gang with a M-60. He always uses science or his wits to destroy his enemies. We are surely missing something here. He goes after Tuco with the "fake meth bomb", gus with the real bomb, and the ricin. Walt can barely even shoot a pistol...

  • L.O.V.E.

    So here is my newest theory. The big-ass gun is really an insurance policy for Walt against the Nazis. They still think of him as a friend. They have "tremendous respect" for him and that's why they didn't kill Skylar.

    He goes see them and takes the ricin with him. He shares a bottle of that Dimple Pinch with the gang and poisons it with the ricin. They all drink it, but he makes himself throw-up, pulling a Gus move.

    He takes all the money from them when they are dead 3 days later. He frees Jesse and gives Jesse his half of the 80 million, and they go their separate ways.

  • Anebo

    Uh, I think at this point, Jesse would try everything in his power to kill Walt, even if he had his hands tied behind his back. And was asleep, even. Not only does he know about Jane now, but he might blame Walt for Andrea's death since Walt told the Nazis about her.

    Also, can you vomit out ricin once it's entered your system? Seems to me like it works a bit more complexly than that.

  • L.O.V.E.

    Jesse is in a hole. He can't do shit to Walt from there, especially if Walt has a big ass gun pointed at him. Walt looks down on Jesse and tells Jesse all the Nazis are dead, where to find his half of the money, and that the money can be used to take care of Brock just like Mike tried to do for his grand-daughter. Then Walt is gone before Jesse can climb out of the hole.

    As for the ricin, it never gets into the blood-stream. Gus successfully pulled off a similar move so its would make sense within the universe of this show.

  • Collin

    True, but what Gus used wasn't Ricin if I remember correctly. It was some kind of poison that worked within hours and caused paralysis/death. Ricin would take a few days and cause flu-like symptoms. I'm not sure if you could throw up the ricin and be ok.

  • Becks

    I believe it has already been established that the vial of ricin is enough to kill 2-3 adults.

  • Sue

    Anyone else wonder what happened to that phony video Walt and Skyler made to incriminate Hank? Wouldn't it be tragic if it ended up in the hands of the DEA with no one left alive to refute it?

  • emmalita

    At this point, Skyler would refute it. Also the phone call from Walt near the end of Ozymandias refutes the video. He took full responsibility.

  • TheAggroCraig

    And how about ending the episode with the extended theme song? Holy Lord, was that brilliant.

  • Sue

    I'd bet that the ricin is for Lydia. I'd like to see Walt exit in a fitting manner, by OD'ing on his own creation, blue meth, which was the cause of so many deaths and tragedies.

  • Bear_Style

    I think Walt will OD on his own creation. He is going to take the Ricin himself, giving him 2-3 days to finish his business and then die, selfishly, and on his own terms.

  • ZizoAH

    The episode was perfect, just one little thing... Am I the only one bothered by how Gretchen and Elliot's name were typed in the TV interview? I was SO ANNOYED that their names where written all in small caps, without capitalizing any first letters.

    Do I need to go to therapy?

  • emmalita

    I didn't even notice. That's some great attention to detail. I've never seen the Charlie Rose Show, but I assume they used his style. So you should be annoyed with Charlie Rose. I understand that being annoyed with Charlie Rose is a common occurrence.

  • ZizoAH

    I don't think I ever saw a Charlie Rose Show.

    Here is how it looked:

  • emmalita

    That is consistent with his show style. It seems a silly affectation.

  • chanohack

    I adore Charlie Rose! I couldn't decide if he's not good at playing himself or if the director had him tone down the Rosiness to avoid him being too much of a distraction from the story. That said, I have no idea if all-lowercase is his style, and I didn't notice it either, but clearly NONE of us need therapy.

  • emmalita

    We may all need therapy.

  • chanohack

    Or that. :)

  • TheAggroCraig

    I have a poor misguided friend who said "so far 6 of these last 7 episodes have been total snoozers" and "the finale of Dexter was better than the second-to-last episode of Breaking Bad". I've never wanted to just slap a dude so much in my life.

  • ZbornakSyndrome

    I made the horrific mistake of watching the finale of Dexter right after BB last night. Mr. Syndrome and I could barely pay attention, and we kept shouting at the screen. I still can't believe how awful that show became.

  • Bert_McGurt

    This episode could have been a musical performed by mimes dressed as Bogdan's eyebrows and it would have STILL made more sense than Dexter.

  • meadowdancer

    LOL! That is the best thing I have read all day.

  • Mrs. Julien

    If this were eligible for EE, I'd nominate it myself.

  • emmalita

    You should get a Nobel Peace Prize for that level of restraint.

  • Mrs. Julien

    I think I've decided that I'd like Walter to survive whatever epic Scarface-style battle comes next week, only to die alone like a dog on the side of the road of the cancer as the ultimate symbol of his lack of control.

    I'll be making my decision later today. I'll keep you posted.

  • ZbornakSyndrome

    I think dying alone, like a nobody, is actually a perfect punishment for Walt. No family, no friends, no blaze of glory - just dies of cancer while everyone pretends he never existed.

  • Mrs. Julien

    Andrea's death was the most upsetting for me. More upsetting than the kid with the spider, if that's possible. Mr. Julien actually had to ask if I was okay because I was just sitting there gaping with my hands over my face. That poor little boy. Is he just going to wander out and find his mother dead? Jesus Christ.

  • Sean

    My cat was laying on my chest when that scene came on. I moved her, as I knew I was about to yell something horrible.

  • chanohack

    I convinced myself that Andrea would not have opened the door for a stranger no matter what he said if Brock was home. Brock was totally at his Grandma's. Grandma will take care of him.

  • Mrs. Julien

    I agree with you. Given where she has come from in her life, I can't imagine she would, but he did say the magic word, "Jesse".

  • Bert_McGurt

    Yeah, I had that thought too. Poor Brock.

  • Mrs. Julien

    Turning to Mr. Julien, "They must have cameras." Cut to Security camera tracking Jesse's escape attempt. At any point in his life, has Jesse EVER had a plan?

  • ZbornakSyndrome

    I was thinking, wouldn't the Nazi compound have some kind of security? Also, I'm surprised there wasn't a camera pointed at Jesse's Pit of Sorrows.

  • Sue

    They don't think that Walt is an enemy. They let him go and "gave" him $11 million.

  • emmalita

    Jesse's Pit of Sorrows, love it!

  • chanohack

    Jesse jumps up and grabs the grate.
    My sister: YAYYYYYY!
    Me: Don't get your hopes up, idiot.

    Jesse runs across the yard.
    Sister: HE'S GONNA MAKE IT! SEE???
    Me: Have you ever WATCHED this show?

  • emmalita

    Your poor sister. Is she traumatized?

  • chanohack

    Yes.

    And she sort of insisted that instead of watching the show, I watch her being traumatized by the show. This show is amazing but LOOK HOW UPSET I AM. I'm like the MOST UPSET PERSON IN THE WHOLE WORLD. :-|

    I'm torn between trying to avoid her for the finale and adjusting my attitude. I should adjust my attitude, right?

  • emmalita

    No. You should avoid her. You can only watch the last episode for the first time once. That should be a sacred viewing. My friends and I have a rule - we can yell at the tv but we can't talk to each other during the show. All questions are reserved for after the show. On a re-watch we talk to each other all we want.

  • Wigamer

    No. Sigh.

  • superasente

    Dan, as always, your writing impresses.

  • Mrs. Julien

    It's nice to see you here today.

  • emmalita

    Why didn't it occur to me before that Lydia would want Skyler dead? Of course she does.

    Saul was amazing. The calm voice of reason to Walt's prideful delusion. I'm glad he got away, but I would have loved to see him cooped up in a cabin in New Hampshire with Walt. That would have been some Sartre level hell is other people.

  • PantsAttack

    The way Anna Gunn played that had me thinking that Skyler didn't even remember Lydia until Balaclava Todd mentioned her.

  • Mrs. Julien

    I kept hoping Skyler would say she doesn't even know Lydia's name just for reinforcement.

  • Guest

    Right. Because I don't think she knows it.

  • chanohack

    That totally caught me by surprise also! I figured Skyler and Holly might be in danger, but because psycho Todd loves neurotic Lydia? Well done, show.

    And the exchange between Walt and Saul was amazing. "It's over when I say *COUGHING FIT*." "It's over." Brilliant.

    Side note: if "Better Call Saul" isn't set in Albuquerque, I shall love it a little less.

  • Mrs. Julien

    I think it will be. I don't think a show about the manager of a Cinnabon in Omaha would be all that compelling.

    Doesn't/shouldn't Saul have a big ole pile of money somewhere? Maybe he'll establish himself in Nebraska and then go to the Caymans.

  • Sue

    As someone who lives in Cayman, don't believe the rumours and movies. You can't just show up here with a bag of cash. Setting up a bank account takes hours and they need to know and have proof of where the money came from.

  • Becks

    Oh my god, you're in Cayman too Sue? I didn't realize there were other Pajibans here. The island seems so much cosier to me now!

  • Sue

    ...and I'm madly loaning out my BB seasons 1-5 DVDs (foisting them on people, really!).

  • Becks

    Haha, you're doing God's work, Sue. You really are.

  • Mrs. Julien

    Then I'd like to substitute whatever place it is without any banking morals. Switzerland?

  • chanohack

    Maybe it was seized when the shit hit the fan? Who knows what happened in the several days between Walt's pick-up and Saul's.

  • Mrs. Julien

    Riiiiight.

    ETA - But he strikes me as getting out while the getting is good and one step ahead of the cops. I think he could still have money.

  • emmalita

    Saul would have back up plans and contingencies.

  • emmalita

    I've heard it's going to be a prequel, so probably set in ABQ. But I would also watch Bob Odenkirk manage a Cinnabon in Omaha. He's so sleazy, he would find a way to make it interesting.

  • Jack London

    For his bluster about doing this for his family, I think Walt's real aim has been to leave behind a legacy. He had resigned himself to dying as long as he could provide for the family, but the Fixer closed the door on that and Junior slammed it firmly shut. So what is he left with? Heisenberg's blue and his role in Greymatter - both of which have been completely usurped.
    When he dies now, nothing will be left behind. In fact, I think Walt is already dead and that what we will see next week are Walt's death throes while Heisenberg's ghost salts the earth.

  • TheAggroCraig

    I think you're completely right. Really, it's been a long time since this has just been about providing for his family, because he's had plenty of ways to get out of the business. But that ego never let it happen. This was once again cemented when he pleaded with his son "Don't let this all be for nothing". What I heard was "I only win if you take the money, so take it because I have to win and my work has to mean something."

  • Fearganainm

    I dunno yet whether or not it was deliberate, but I can't help but feel that the writers missed out on the opportunity of revealing Andreas death to Walt by way of all those Albequerque newspapers that Robert Forsters fixer delivered to him.
    That would have been another hammer blow to Walt, another innocent sacrificed.
    I get the feeling Jesse might remember some chemistry skills that Walt taught him during his last cook... roll on next week.

  • Becks

    Do you think Walt would care? He was the one who gave up Andrea and Brock to the Nazis anyway. He wants Jesse dead. He wasn't even particularly upset when Todd shot an innocent little boy and he poisoned Andrea's son just to regain control of Jesse and manipulate him. I don't think Walt spends a lot of time feeling bad for innocent people.

  • Wigamer

    So there Walt sits, having finally realized it's all been for nothing--his sister-in-law, wife, and son have all expressed the wish that he'd go ahead and die already, no one wants his money except Mr. Disappearer Guy--and then the damn Charlie Rose show.

    And true to form, Walt's insecurity and belief that no one understands either his genius or his sacrifices is going to drive him to do some more stupid shit. He's no bad-ass hitting town to rescue Jesse or get his money back. He's just trying to show he's not going out like a punk. And when all that's over it will *still* have been for nothing, because he's gonna die anyway.

  • Fredo

    Because, deep down, this has all been about Walt. As Saul tells him, if he cares about his family, turn yourself in. Take the heat off Skyler and the kids. They'll get to keep the house and, somehow, the money in that last barrel may one day reach them. But he's so consumed with rage at how to get back at Jack and the Neo-Nazis (blaming them for Hank's death) that he has to refuse.

    Even as he's dying alone in that cabin in New Hampshire, paying $10,000 for an hour of Robert Forster's time (and btw, while I think spending an hour with Robert Forster has to be really cool, for $10K, I'd hope for more than just cards), he refuses to recognize the situation when faced with it. It's not until confronted with the "what could have been his life" of Gretchen and Elliot that he decides to stand up and go back. But not for his family, for his legacy. That's what that barrel represents: his legacy. His hard work. His talent. What he really is.

    And his son throws it back in his face. Well, fuck that, goddammit!

    Aside: as long as AMC is approving spin-offs, how about a show about the vacuum cleaner? Come on, you mean to tell me you wouldn't want Robert Forster for an hour every week, spiriting criminals, ne'er do wells and the lawyers that love them out of town?

  • emmalita

    That phone call with Flynn was amazing. I believed that he was happy to hear his son's voice, but it was still all about Walt.

  • Wigamer

    Poor Flynn. It's his rejection that just has to gut Walt.

  • ZbornakSyndrome

    That was the best part of the episode for me. Who knew what Flynn was capable of once he put the Wheaties down?

    Any time someone contradicts the script Walt has in his head, he doesn't know what to do. He thought it was going to be a touching reconciliation, he had no idea what to do with Flynn's rage - all he could do was try to explain that Flynn was wrong and Walt was right, that Flynn wasn't seeing things clearly.
    It may be Walt's greatest tragedy, that he can't comprehend people that dissent.

  • PantsAttack

    We were told that there were going to be no loose ends by the wrap up of the show, right? I seem to remember that in an interview somewhere. But what is driving me NUTS (and I don't see how they're going to resolve it) is Gus Fring. Who the hell was he that the cartel wouldn't kill him when they killed his cook/lover? by the pool. Did we learn that somewhere along the way?

  • Bert_McGurt

    If I recall correctly, Gus was a high-ranking member of the Chilean military during Pinochet's rule.

  • PantsAttack

    I thought that, but I couldn't remember if I had seen that on the show or read that in a discredited spoiler. (ETA: I thought it was the latter--discredited spoiler) Worlds colliding. Thanks!

  • Becks

    I do remember hearing this. Was it fan speculation or have they ever actually confirmed it on the show?

  • Tilly

    I would have to go back and watch to be sure but I seem to remember one of the cartel dudes saying to Gus that as much as he'd like to kill Gus and keep the cook, Gus is family/related to other, higher-up cartel dudes back in wherever Gus comes from and killing him would cause a problem with those higher-ups, so he kills the cook and keeps Gus instead.

  • Kurt Boyer

    Daniel, I respect your level of passion and understanding for this show. But given that, it's incredibly strange that you would call Jesse "dumb." He's not a very book smart guy, no, but the show has gone out of its way for five seasons to show us his shrewd, unique intelligence.

  • Sean

    Magnets bitches! Jessie clearly isn't stupid. An ignorant, naive drug addict, yes. Stupid, no.

  • Wigamer

    Jesse's strength is that he's not totally eaten up with himself the way Walt is. He can't compete with Walt if we're talking raw IQ scores, but he doesn't have the same blind spots, which (sometimes) helps him see more of the angles. Except last night, obviously.

  • ZbornakSyndrome

    He did think of a plan to expose Walt, which Walt totally fell for.

  • Arco

    And how ironic that the main thing that tore Walter's family from him and made them hate him is them thinking he killed Hank. The one man he tried everything to save. So very much like this show...

  • Arco

    Great episode...the quiet long, lonely suffering after last week's storm. Indeed forcing us to be with Walt and be cut off from most of the rest of the characters.

    Odd thing: I am fascinated by Todd.

    When he shot the kid in the desert, I dismissed him as a conscience- and emotion-free sociopath. But he's actually more interesting than that. It's thanks to him Walter was spared last week, and even left some money. He didn't have to do that. A true sociopath wouldn't have done that. He said 'sorry' to Walt. He didn't have to do that. He didn't have to bring Jesse desert.

    Am I arguing he's not so bad? Oh no, this guy is a monster, but a unique one. He will torture you, he will shoot an innocent girl without the slightest hesitation. But he will say 'Hey, no hard feelings' and even mean it. Jack wouldn't say that, he'd just have shot her.

    Todd will carve out your guts and say "Hey, sorry about this' and then do it without either hesitation or sadistic pleasure.

    I really can't think of any other character like him. And man, does someone need to kill him...

  • chanohack

    He's absolutely a sociopath. Sociopaths aren't people who never do good or nice things, they are people with no conscience or empathy. Todd didn't want Mr. White to die, not because he couldn't stand the thought of Mr. White suffering (empathy), not because murder is wrong (conscience), but because he WANTED Mr. White to be alive because Todd likes Mr. White. Saying "Sorry for your loss" does not mean he's actually sorry for anything-- he just wants Walt to like him, so he said a thing that (I believe) didn't mean anything to Todd at all because it seemed like the right thing to say. I feel like he was looking at Walt crumpled on the ground, in agony, thinking, "What's he so upset about? This guy clearly had to die! But he's mad, and I want to be his friend... Say something. What do people say in these situations?"

    He's a vastly fascinating character. But sociopathic for damn sure.

  • ZbornakSyndrome

    I totally agree. I was just going to say, Sociopaths can mimic affect, just not convincingly. He wants Walt to like him (and Jesse) because he's decided that they are both useful and interesting. But if he really had to kill them, he wouldn't have a problem doing it.

    He knows he should tell Walt, "sorry for your loss", but he isn't capable of summoning the appropriate emotion for it.

  • BLZ Bubb

    do you think Vince GIlligan is a Big Head Todd and the Monsters fan?

    http://www.bigheadtodd.com/

  • emmalita

    I keep comparing Todd to Dexter. He's what Dexter should have been. Todd has a very simplistic understanding of the human psyche and knows lots of polite phrases. Jesse Plemons is brilliant. Just brilliant. Just a little quirk of the lips to indicate his pride at shooting Drew Sharpe.

  • ZbornakSyndrome

    Man, what I wouldn't have given to see Todd pop up on Dexter and put Dex out of his misery before this final season aired...

  • TheAggroCraig

    That kinda got to me, how he was so god damned proud of it.

  • Fredo

    Caught the tail end of "Talking Bad" and Chris Hardwick had a good name for Todd: "Murder Spock." As in, he's extremely logical and dispassionate in his very evil actions. He's not rageful or sadistic. But if you got to go, Todd will make sure you're gone.

  • jjolla

    Dont underestimate the importance of Gray Matter - i think a LOT more is going to come out in the last episode

    It wouldnt surprise if it was revealed that GM got involved in illegal ways right at the beginning -- and that Walt left for ethical reasons. It would explain why their success gets so much under his skin. Especially so the revelations of the charity giveaway that we just saw.

  • Becks

    What? It's nothing like that. Walt was engaged to Gretchen and then when he met her family they were so rich and successful that he was intimidated. He let his insecurity rule all and dumped her. She rebounded with Elliot and he was presumably jealous and angry and asked them to buy him out for $5000. Walt has always been egotistical and consumed by his pride.

    Their success gets under his skin because he knows he squandered a chance at billions.

  • Kate

    Exactly. We've seen a little of the Gretchen/Walt relationship and back in the day she was pretty much in awe of his intelligence, and he's was clearly the dominant person in the relationship. Then we find out their relationship and Walt's involvement in Gray Matter all fell apart during a weekend spent with Gretchen's father and brother's, and Gretchen still has no clue what happened, Walt just packed his bags and left in a rage. I can imagine it being about something as trivial as a bit of good-natured ribbing.

    That's the interesting thing about Walt. When we first meet him he's down-trodden and kind of pathetic, but I think he started out more like the Walt he is today, a big bundle of ego always ready to go on the attack. He left Gray Matter and there seem to have been quite a few good jobs that fell apart before he ended up in his dead end teaching job. I've known people like him, and they always end up doing a crappy job because although they're very smart, they can't stand anyone being smarter than them or anyone questioning them or anyone thinking they're better than them, and every time they encounter someone who fits that description they essentially lose their shit. These people quit their jobs a lot. They all end up in jobs they could do in their sleep, but they get to be the smartest guy in the room without question, so that's the job they manage to hold down. And in a way they seem content. Far from happy, but they calm down.

    To my mind Walt's always been this person, cooking meth just escalated his violent tendencies.

  • JJ

    We do appreciate what you're doing, Dan. Not everyone wants dream-casting, rampant speculation, conspiracy theorizing, and guesswork. It's appreciating what's happening as it's happening instead the focus on the end. It's why I think so many people are unsatisfied with the ending and the supposed closure (or lack thereof) provided. I certainly want to know what's going to happen, but more than that I want to continue to see how it's done.

  • L.O.V.E.

    Walt in that bar, all set to give up. His 2 legacies up there on the t.v., with his billionaire former partners discarding his first great discovery. Then his blue meth is still getting made without him. Jesse must still be alive. The ricin may be a response to the former, and the machine gun for the latter.

  • emmalita

    Oh he hated that they were so dismissive of him. Hated it.

  • Iman Alterego

    I am thinking that he won't allow all of the Old Walt to disappear and that he somehow coerces Gretchen and Elliot to funnel his money to Skyler and the kids.

  • Becks

    How do you think he would accomplish that in a way that comes off as believable or in character though?

  • Becks

    I don't think Walt would ever go after Gretchen and Elliot in that way. Distancing themselves from him was a PR move and probably also had something to do with the shock of discovering the truth about him. He blames them but is also mostly bitter because deep down he knows he ruined things with Gretchen and he was the one who asked to be bought out of Gray Matter. The news cast was mostly to show us and Walt that Jesse and the Nazis are still out there making his meth and he is not going to allow another one of his profitable businesses to be stolen out from under him.

  • I think it's also possible the interview is a potential set-up to draw out Walt.

  • junierizzle

    But who knows that that would draw him out?

  • Bert_McGurt

    Gretchen and Elliott would.

  • It's a common cop ploy--appeal to the ego.

blog comments powered by Disqus



film / tv / lists / guides / box-office / news / love / celeb / video / think pieces / staff / TV Podcast / books / cbr




Trending


Follow Us



Related Posts




Viral Hits
Celebrity Facts

The Best TV & Movie Quotes

The Walking Dead

How I Met Your Mother

True Detective

Parks and Recreation

Cosmos

Hannibal

30 Practical Tips About the Horrors of Raising Children

25 Practical Tips About the Horrors of Raising Twins