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We'd Better Get a Voiceover from Quint: WB Filming Story of USS Indianapolis

By Steven Lloyd Wilson | Industry | August 18, 2011 |

By Steven Lloyd Wilson | Industry | August 18, 2011 |


WB has reportedly bought the rights to the life story of one Hunter Scott, who other than having a perfect name for being a roguish scion on a soap opera, also was the 11-year-old boy who made it a personal mission to redeem the court-martialed captain of the USS Indianapolis 30 years after his suicide.

The USS Indianapolis of course is the famed American cruiser that sunk in the last weeks of World War II after a Japanese submarine attack. Because it was on a top secret mission (delivering parts of the atomic bomb to its assembly area), no one noticed when it never showed up at its next station. And because sometimes the universe really sucks, three different American stations received the ship's distress calls, but ignored them for one reason or another. Once the men hit the water, the sharks arrived, and for four days they feasted on the hundreds of helpless sailors. I'll let Quint pick up the story at this point:


In any case, after the war, Captain McVay was court-martialed despite the opinion of the survivors that there was nothing he could have done differently. The Japanese submarine commander even testified that the charges were absurd, that he had the ship dead-to-rights and none of the suggestions of action proposed by the prosecution would have mattered a damn. McVay was the only American commander court-martialed for losing his ship in World War II, and it was clearly in response to the horrific aftermath of the sinking. McVay killed himself in 1968, and was not exonerated until 2001 and the efforts of Hunter Scott.

So that makes a fantastic hook into the story, but it also makes me wonder. Hunter Scott was eleven in 1996 and so around 26 today. Has he really given up on doing anything meaningful with his life such that he's already sold his life story? Talk about peaking young. Selling your life story at age 26 seems a bit like selling your soul.



Steven Lloyd Wilson is the sci-fi and history editor. You can email him here or follow him on Twitter.


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